This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
San Francisco 49ers project executive


Jack Hill says sustainability is at the centre of the design. “We’ve incorporated a lot of energy saving measures within the stadium itself and we’re incorporated green thinking into everything we do – such as recycling most of the construction debris.”


TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION Not only will Levi’s Stadium be one of the most eco-friendly in the world, but it will also be one of the most technologically advanced. According to CEO Jed York, the aim is to have a ticketless, cashless building by enabling visitors to present their passes, order food and purchase goods by using nothing but their mobile devices. Fans' tablets and smart phones will also act as personal entertainment centres, information points and scoreboards thanks to the 49ers mobile app. The app, custom designed to be used


in the stadium, will feature a “real-time dashboard” for game-day fan tech features and a data analytics suite for use by the team’s executives. The idea is to allow fans to step away from their seats – to visit bathrooms or to make purchase at retail and F&B points – without missing any action. The app will feature a live


www.sportshandbook.com


feed of the game, replays, stats and even a function displaying queuing times at the stadium’s various points of sale. For the app to work, though, fans must have reliable access to the internet – and a lot of bandwith. This in mind, the stadium is set to have the best publicly accessible Wi-Fi network of a sports facility anywhere in the US. What makes it so special is that it should allow all 68,500 fans to have access to high-speed internet simultaneously. Until now, the limits


of large-scale bandwidth have meant that stadium operators have found it impossible to build a network that would let every single fan connect at once. To solve the issue, The 49ers utilised the stadium’s closeness to Silicon Valley and recruited two top class IT professionals. The club’s chief technology officer is Kunal Malik, regarded as one of Silicon Valley’s leading tech experts and the man who


The app has a range of in-game features


led the creation of the IT department at Facebook. He is partnered by senior IT director, Dan Williams, who spent four years at Facebook. The pair have announced plans to have a terabit of capacity within the stadium. That means that even if every single fan would bring an internet device to use at the game, each smart phone and tablet would still have around 15mb to use. Speaking at the


SVForum sports technology conference in Palo Alto in December 2013, Malik said: “Working on the Levi’s Stadium is like taking a blank piece of


paper and redefining the fan experience. We wanted to make sure fans would be able to move around the stadium without missing any of the play – but couldn’t find anyone who was doing it in real-time so we had to design and produce it ourself.” Those who prefer a traditional


scoreboard won’t be disappointed either. Sports Management Handbook 2014-2015 65


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164