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INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT


EMERGING NATIONS


The balance of power of hosting international sports events is shifting away from Europe and North America. Major competitions are now being held in countries which until


recently would have been described as "developing". But how sustainable is the progress being made by these countries? We speak to international development expert Derek Casey


TOM WALKER l T 54 MANAGING EDITOR l


here are a number of emerging countries whose fast growing economies and future prospects are attracting funding from


foreign investors. Grouped under terms such as BRIC and MINT, these countries are challenging the more traditional industrial powerhouses with their natural resources and, in many cases, by offering a more “affordable” environment for manufacturing and production. Inevitably, the economic growth


in these countries has resulted in the expansion of middle classes, which has created the need for improved services, health care – and leisure. There is a particularly strong correlation between economic development and sport in many


SPORTS MANAGEMENT


of the emerging nations. As the countries have developed, they have come to use sport – and particularly the hosting of international competitions – as a marketing tool. All of the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China) have won bids to host major sporting events in recent years (see table 1), while the MINT countries (Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey) are beginning to show interest in doing so. Turkey has already thrown its hat in, with Istanbul narrowly losing out on the rights to the 2020 Olympics to Tokyo and Japan. What has been conspicuous in the


approach taken by some countries, however, is how the development of competitive sport domestically has not


Sports Management Handbook 2014-2015 www.sportshandbook.com


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