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INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS


New Zealand Sports Industry Association (NZSIA)


PO Box 41076, Auckland, New Zealand


Tel: +64 9 845 3550 Email: nzsia@retail.org.nz www.nzsia.co.nz


The New Zealand Sports Industry Association was formed in 1987 by merging the NZ Sports Dealers Federation and the NZ Sports Goods Industries Association into one organisation: NZSIA.


NZSIA is a trade membership association comprised of suppliers and dealers with the aim of strengthening and integrating the activities of members involved in the sports industry. Its objectives include promoting the


sale of sporting leisure and recreational equipment and services to consumers through the member chain of supply; encouraging New Zealanders to take a more active part in sport and recreation; educating and assisting members to operate effective, profitable and successful businesses; influencing government and other legislative bodies on issues in the best interests of the industry; developing and maintaining benefits and services for all sectors of membership; and maintaining an organisation structure that addresses the expectations and the needs of industry.


The Sports and Play Construction Association (SAPCA)


Federation House, Stoneleigh Park, CV8 2RF, UK


Tel: +44 (0)24 7641 6316 Email: info@sapca.org.uk www.sapca.org.uk


SAPCA is a recognised trade association for the sports and play construction industry in the UK. It was formed by the industry in 1997 as a non-profit-seeking organisation funded by the industry.


The association's role is to foster excellence, professionalism and continuous improvement throughout the industry to provide the high-quality facilities needed at all levels of sport, physical activity, recreation and play. Having originally represented primarily


specialist sports surfacing contractors, the association has since evolved and expanded to embrace a wide range of disciplines within the sports and play facilities industry. SAPCA has more than 240 corporate


members UK-wide, all with a direct involvement in sports and play facility development. Members include contractors, manufacturers and suppliers, professional consultants and test labora- tories, as well as sports governing bodies and related organisations.


Sporta


49-51 East Road, London, N1 6AH, UK


Tel: +44 (0)7767 823 320 Email: info@sporta.org www.sporta.org


Sporta is a national association representing a wide range of leisure and cultural trusts in communities across the UK. Together they provide 30 per cent of public leisure centres in the UK.


The facilities and activities which they deliver in partnership with local authorities support a range of physical activity, sports and community cultural services. Many facilities are open seven days a


week from early in the morning until late at night. The trusts are also committed to being as accessible and affordable as possible for everyone and many operate in deprived communities. They also support public policy objectives, including public health and community cohesion. Sporta membership is open to non-profit


distributing organisations – primarily, but not exclusively, those that manage cultural and leisure facilities. The network spreads across the whole of


the UK, with regular meetings at regional as well as national level.


www.sportshandbook.com


Sports Management Handbook 2014-2015


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