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INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS


European Stadium & Safety Management Association (ESSMA)


Rapertingenstraat 109, 3500 Hasselt, Belgium


Tel: +32 486 72 31 89 Email: dimitri@essma.eu www.essma.eu


ESSMA was launched in 1995 by Lionel Dreksler, the former stadium director of Parc Des Prince in Paris. It incorporates head groundsmen and represents 300 people involved in the stadium industry. Its aim is to share know-how and expertise through its activities.


ESSMA collects technical information for operations and safety management throughout Europe to enhance industry awareness of the latest techniques and de- velopments in niche markets related to the organisation of stadiums. The association's vision is to be the


leading European platform for stadium management networking on a global scale. By acquiring sustainable know-how via a combination of stadium and safety management and qualitative industry partners, ESSMA aims to offer added value by sharing know-how and expertise with its members and consequently bring stadiums to a higher level from conception to operation. In 2008, John Beattie, stadium director


of Emirates Stadium in London, was appointed as the new president.


www.sportshandbook.com


The Federation of Sports and Play Associations (FSPA)


Federation House, Stoneleigh Park, CV8 2RF, UK


Tel: +44 (0)2476 414 999 Email: info@sportsandplay.com www.sportsandplay.com


The Federation of Sports and Play Associations was formed in 1919 and formally incorporated in 1926 as the national trade body responsible for representing 18 associations and 600 member companies in the sports and play industries.


The federation has a long history of serving the industry, and in 2009 FSPA celebrated its 90th anniversary. As the voice of the industry, the


association is ideally positioned at the very heart of the trade. On behalf of its members, it has strategic partnerships with Sport & Recreation Alliance (formerly CCPR), Youth Sport Trust and Sport England, as well as open dialogue with the Culture Media and Sport and the Business, Innovation and Skills government departments. In 2009/10, the federation forged a new


and exciting partnership with the County Sports Partnership Network, providing members with opportunities to work with Sport England's vital County Sports Part- nerships.


International Association for Sports and Leisure Facilities (IAKS)


Eupener Strasse 70, 50933 Cologne, Germany


Tel: +49 (0)221 1680 23 0 Email: iaks@iaks.info www.iaks.info


IAKS is the International Association for Sports and Leisure Facilities. This non-profit organisation was founded in Cologne, Germany, in 1965 and represents 1,000 members in 110 countries.


IAKS' membership base comprises a global network for the design, construction, modernisation and management of sports and leisure facilities. These members benefit from the association's international outlook, worldwide exchange of experience and services. Its goal is to create high-grade,


functional and sustainable sports facilities worldwide, with an emphasis on inter- national exchange and the ongoing development of quality standards. The International Association for Sports


and Leisure Facilities contributes to the economic and environmentally friendly realisation of sports and leisure facility projects worldwide. It thereby highlights the right of citizens to demand-driven and functional sports facilities.


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