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essence motoring


“Operating from a brand new workshop at Browns Lane – now open for the restoration and servicing of customer cars – the building of six new, meticulously crafted Lightweight E-type period competition cars by Jaguar Heritage is testament to the unique skills within the team. To know those same skills can also be utilised to the benefit of existing classic Jaguar owners means this is a very exciting time for Jaguar Heritage.”


Derek Weale, director, Jaguar Heritage Business


the current modern range, the F- TYPE and XJ models also utilise aluminium for the same reason. As a result, Jaguar now leads the world in the manufacture of aluminium- bodied cars. In this relatively new field it has an unrivalled experience of applying aluminium technology to volume production cars. The six-cylinder XK engine mirrors


the original, with an aluminium block, ‘wide angle’ aluminium cylinder head and dry sump lubrication. The original car was powered by a highly developed version of Jaguar’s straight-six XK engine that remained highly advanced in 1963, even though it had first been seen in the XK 120 as far back as 1948. It was this engine that powered


the C- and D-types to five Le Mans’ victories in the 1950s. The latest unit developed is based on the 3,868cc


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engine that, in the D-type, won Le Mans in 1957. In place of the D- type’s cast iron block, Jaguar has introduced an aluminium block which has substantially reduced weight over the front wheels. Jaguar’s design studio was tasked and has achieved the appropriate level of trim for the new car. A palette of six 'heritage' paint shades has been chosen for the exterior: carmine red, opalescent grey metallic, silver metallic, opalescent blue metallic, British racing green and Old English white. Various colour and trim alternatives are available as each car is built to personal specification. Connolly leather is used, supplied by Jonathan Connolly, with hides produced to the same specification as those used by Jaguar in the 1960s. The cars are to be sold as period competition vehicles and all will be


suitable for FIA homologation for historic motorsport purposes. Of the originals, all but one left Jaguar’s Browns Lane competitions department in 1963. The last car, delivered in 1964, is the car now replicated in each of the six, and Car Zero. All have been built to the exact specification as this very last Lightweight E-Type – No.12 – that left the factory half a century ago. Jaguar is reluctant to divulge the


price tag placed on the reborn classic, as each will be individual. The firm is looking to approach potential customers they feel will best suit the brand. It aims to identify people who will take full advantage of the car’s racing pedigree, in preference to being shut away in a collection never to see the light of day. Is there anyone out there? I think so…form an orderly queue please.





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