This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
essence motoring


I


t sounds rather dramatic and the stuff of films, but Project ‘Special GT E-type’ commenced


in 1963 with the remit to construct 18 cars of the iconic model suitable to compete at the highest level on the race track. The project halted two-thirds of the way through at 12, leaving six cars unbuilt. Now that project has been


resurrected and Jaguar Heritage will produce the remaining cars to complete the original project 50 years on. Thus just six customer specific cars will be built. A prototype model (dubbed Car Zero) was recently exhibited at the Pebble Beach classic car show in California. Zero is identical in all aspects to the Lightweight model, but does not


24 www.essence-magazine.co.uk


carry one of the unique six chassis numbers originally allocated in 1963. The new ‘missing’ six vehicles from the project use the remaining designated chassis numbers that have lain dormant, until now. During its short competitive


career the E-type was a race winner, achieving worldwide fame in the hands of a variety of famous drivers. The cars are still highly sought after and original examples in tip top condition are now valued in millions. Out of the 12 built from the ‘Special GT E-type’ project it’s believed that 11 are still in existence today. In recreating the Lightweight, Jaguar has drawn on all its engineering and design expertise,


including the company’s world- leading aluminium body technology. Some of the craftsmen involved even claim an indirect link with the E-type from its early days. One technician calculated that his family – including grandparents, father and uncle – had a collective 170 years’ service stretching back to the early 1960s.


Specification of the Lightweight includes the core component aluminium bodyshell, with doors, boot, hardtop and bonnet all of the same material. This much lighter metal replaced the steel of the production E-type in the quest to shed weight. Despite the fifty-year gap, aluminium provides an affinity with


>


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84