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EssentialNews


NEWS FROM THE INDUSTRY KEEPING YOU CONNECTED


FRACINO HAILED AS A NATIONAL EXPORT CHAMPION


(Pictured left to right) are: Bryony Bates, Fracino founder Frank Maxwell and sales manager John McGinnell


Manufacturer Fracino, which sells its coffee machines to over 70 countries including Italy, has been nominated as a UK national champion in the European Business Awards for its strong growth in international trade. The company, which posted


an unprecedented £4.1million turnover this year, is among a record 709 national champions representing 33 countries in the first round of the awards, supported by key influencers such as EU Trade Commissioner Karel de Gucht.


Fracino, which launched an export arm from scratch in 2008, will now go onto compete for the coveted Ruban d’Honneur in the import/export award category.


Adrian Maxwell, Fracino’s managing


director, said: “It is tremendous that our innovation, investment and success in international trade are being recognised by such prestigious shortlisting’s. We always strive to punch above our weight and deliver world class manufacturing standards as we make


inroads into new countries including Guatamela, French Polynesia and Singapore.” The manufacturer has injected almost £3m into cutting edge machinery and expansion to new premises since Easter 2012 and developed six machines in the last six years.


More information: Fracino +44 (0)121 3285757 www.fracino.com


POWER PLAY ON THE HIGH STREET beset with inefficient energy practices.


E.ON said that 38% of catering and


hospitality businesses use out of date or inefficient machinery


Britain’s high street businesses are using energy to gain a competitive advantage on rivals, according to new research by E.ON.


The study revealed that more than half (58%) of small businesses observe the efficiency habits to learn from neighbouring stores and more than one in 10 (12%) use electricity as a tactic to lure customers from competitors – such as through the use of shop-front gadgets and attractive lighting. But while businesses say energy can boost prospects, many may be wasting far more than they realise. Nine in ten (91%) believe others in their sector are less efficient than they are, whilst still admitting that their industry sectors are


Overuse of equipment or machinery is the most common energy ‘mistake’ identified by small firms (49%) as well as the use of inefficient or outdated appliances and fixtures (42%). Excessive use of lighting (38%) and air conditioning and/or heating (29%) were also highlighted as regular pitfalls. Anthony Ainsworth, business energy director at E.ON, said: “This research paints a picture of British businesses sitting side-by-side on the high street, competing not just amongst rival firms in the same sectors but also against neighbours in order to attract customers.


“Using attractive lighting can be a useful way to exhibit goods or attract customers but it may not be cost-effective if you rely on outdated or inefficient fixtures to light your store through the night. One of our customers told us he’d managed to save £600 a month by replacing his older lighting with new LED fittings.”


Anthony added: “Small behavioural changes can significantly improve efficiency, such as upgrading equipment and the systems for controlling them. This needn’t be costly for small businesses.”


More information: E.ON +44 (0)333 2024920 www.eonenergy.com


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