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Sheepwash War Memorial


The centenary of Britain entering WWI was the 4th August, and this prompted the research into the men who are honoured on the Memorial in Sheepwash Village Square.


Following the article in the last Chronicle, Gary Fisher has been in touch with lots of information, including information about one of the men about whom I could find nothing, so together we are making progress.


Thanks to Chris and Bee, who have repainted the names on the Memorial, we were able to establish that the name I thought was Small, and about whom I could find no record, was actually Smale, and so we have been able to trace him now. Thank you, Chris and Bee! Thanks also to Frank for doing such a great job cleaning the Memorial – it looks great.


The websites of Commonwealth War Graves Commission and Forces War Records have proved invaluable in finding details of our war dead, along with their family address at the time of their death. The 1911 Census then gives us more information on where they were living, and their family circumstances, just three years before the war started.


We are hoping to publish an article in the Chronicle for each person named on the Memorial, on or before the anniversary of his death. The first will be Private William Tucker who died on 14th January 1917, aged 40. His parents were Richard and Eliza Tucker of Lake Farm, Sheepwash.


We would like to gather as much information as possible for each individual, and hope this will be held as part of the history of our village. So if you have any information on any of the names below – or their family names – please get in touch with Helen or Gary.


WWI Henry Harvey WWII Thomas Luxton


Thomas D Jones


Helen Orr Tel: 01409 231199 Email: helenorr@mac.com


Raymond L Smale


Gary Fisher Tel: 01409 231582 Email: g@ryfisher.com


The Power of the Internet


There is an old joke that goes, “The three fastest ways to send a message – telephone, telegram, tell a woman!”


Nowadays, telegrams don’t exist, and “tell a woman” is very politically incorrect, so the joke doesn’t work any more, but we have a much more powerful way to get a message, or indeed any information, out into the world – the Internet.


My parents and I lived in Sheepwash with my grandparents, Dennis and Mable Barrable, in East Street, just after the war (I was born in 1946). So, idly “surfing” on the internet a couple of months ago, I was intrigued to discover the Sheepwash Chronicle website.


Browsing through the past issues on there, I came across an article published in June 2011 where Brian Jones, Bob Venton and Ron Petts talked about the old days in Sheepwash and Ron mentioned he was an evacuee during the war, and stayed with Dennis andMable Barrable in East Street!


I now live in Swindon, but after a few emails to the editors I have been able to contact both Bob and Ron by telephone, and we all hope to meet up soon. It was really good to talk to them again, though I had a scary moment when Ron said he has a photo of me as a baby – hopefully, much too shocking to print in the Chronicle!


So I just wanted to write and say thank you for putting the Chronicle online, and keep up the good work! Eric Barrable


20 William Tucker Otho H Woodley


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