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INNOVATIONS IN PAINTING: SELECTIONS FROM THE COLLECTION OCTOBER 25, 2014 – FEBRUARY 15, 2015


__ TUESDAY DECEMBER 9, 12 PM


NOON @ THE ‘SPOON Public Tour __


The artists featured in this exhibition have pushed the physical and conceptual limits of painting to create original, often groundbreaking work by illustrating new perspectives on traditional motifs, experimenting with abstraction, or employing innovative techniques. Willem de Kooning’s forays into abstracted form and his vigorous paint application are echoed in the work of contemporary artists, such as Ralph Humphrey and Scott Richter, for whom process and the materiality of paint have remained fundamental subjects. Other painters have probed the visual tension that results from the contrasting flatness and illusion of space within the pictorial plane. For example, Tom LaDuke creates complexly layered work by culling images from popular culture and art history while Creighton Michael’s webs of intersecting lines play off against a shaped canvas. Even works that appear unassuming at first glance, such as Harriet Korman’s Untitled or Robert Indiana’s Route 66, demonstrate the ever-evolving language of painting.


Organized by Elaine D. Gustafson, Curator of Collections.


Willem de Kooning,Woman, 1949-50, oil on canvas, 64 1/8 x 46 in. Lena Kernodle McDuffie memorial purchase, 1954.


AHEAD OF THE CURVE: SELECTIONS FROM THE VIRGINIA DWAN COLLECTION NOVEMBER 8, 2014 – FEBRUARY 8, 2015


The 1960s and 70s were a time of extraordinary artmaking initiatives, particularly the birth in America of Minimalism, Conceptual Art, and Earthworks. Virginia Dwan was part of the inner circle and early supporters of these new and experimental movements. Her foresight and advocacy led her to establish Dwan Gallery, first in Los Angeles (1959- 1967) and later in New York (1965-1971). In addition to advancing contemporary art, Dwan donated objects by such renowned artists as Arman, Jim Dine, Sol LeWitt, Larry Rivers, and Robert Smithson to public institutions. Culled from her gifts to the Weatherspoon, the objects featured in this exhibition illustrate the creative spirit of both Dwan and the artists she represented, as well as the extraordinary period of artmaking in which she participated.


Organized by Elaine D. Gustafson, Curator of Collections.


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