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NEWS & VIEWS SPICE BUSINES S HISTORIC PUB TO GET SPICY SHAKE-UP


AN historic former pub that dates back to the 1850s, the Duke of York in Burnley, is to be converted into a curry restaurant. A listed building, which gives its name to the city’s Duke


TAKING THE DEVIL’S KITCHEN CHALLENGE


Hull restaurant Tapasya, which recently celebrated its first anniversary, is to become to host a Devil’s Kitchen charity challenge, welcoming teams from Barclays Bank and Baker Tilly chartered accountants. It is the first Indian restaurant to do so, it is believed. Launched in Hull and East Yorkshire by the Smile Foundation


in 2009, Devil’s Kitchen has since expanded into a hugely successful nationwide project and has hosted more than 3000 diners, raising more than £300,000 for local charities. Guests invited by the


competitors from their business networks pay what they think is a fair price for a meal which is cooked and served by teams from


Bar area, has been bought by a un-named local businessman after being empty and on the market for a number of years. The buyer plans to invest heavily, refurbishing the building to create an Asian restaurant. It is expected that many of the original features will be retained and it is possible that the old historic name will somehow be worked into the new title of the restaurant, according to local reports. n


the two businesses. All the donations go to charities in the local area.


Mukesh Tirkoti, a


director at Tapasya, said: “A lot of people pride themselves on being able to cook a good curry but when the teams come here they will find that things are a little


different. We don’t just cook curry, we serve Indian food but with the highest fine- dining standards, and the waiters will need to know their way around more than 100 different bottles of wine.” n


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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2014 ISSUE 52


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