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NEWS & VIEWS SPICE BUSINES S


BLIND DOG


BARRED


WALLINGFORD Tandoori has been accused of breaking the law by refusing admittance to a blind man because he was accompanied by his guide dog. Sixty-year- old Mike Leader visited the restaurant with a friend, but they were asked to leave as they had Tudor, a Golden Retriever, with them. Mike said: “It was obvious I was blind when we walked in, but the man in the restaurant said ‘the only way we can serve you is if you leave your dog outside’. I told him the restaurant was breaking the law, but he refused to give me his name.” Wallingford Tandoori manager, Salim Uddin,


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has apologised and claimed the problem was due to the fact the waiter did not know the legislation. That issue will be addressed and guide dogs allowed in future, he has promised. Visual disability charities have said that more needs to be done to educate people about the law. Hugh Huddy, Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB) policy manager, said: “A guide dog is a vital mobility aid and it is against the law to refuse a blind or partially sighted person service in a pub or restaurant because they are a guide dog user.”


Under the Equality Act 2010 employers can be held responsible if their staff unlawfully discriminate against a customer, so RNIB recommends that all


SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2014 ISSUE 52


businesses provide disability awareness training to their employees. As well as making sure that they are aware of their legal obligations, well trained staff will be better equipped to understand and meet the needs of their disabled customers, the charity points out. n


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