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FEATURE SPICE BUSINES S


BEKASH SHOWS A NEW GENERATION IS RISING TO THE CHALLENGE


ONE of the aims of the British Curry Awards is to encourage a new generation to view the spice restaurant business as a positive career choice. It has been extremely successful in achieving that goal and the Bekash Restaurant in Essex - nominated in the 2013 awards - is a case in point.


The Bekash


Restaurant, situated just outside the small


14


town of Wickford, was founded in 1989 by Mashuk Miah. Mashuk came to the UK in the 1970s with the same dream of most Bangladeshi men of that time, which was to earn a living, and achieve a better life for their families. After many years of


hard work, opening restaurants around the UK, he moved to Wickford where he spotted a location


SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2014 ISSUE 52


which, according to all his associates, was unrealistic and impossible to do business in. But Mashuk had a vision of opening a restaurant in Wickford in a location where there were no houses or shops, and no walking trade. It was simply a house with a flower shop at the front, on a busy main road. Mashuk took the risk and put all his life savings in to buy this


property, which had to be virtually demolished and rebuilt from scratch. It took two years of court battles for him just to get a licence to open the restaurant. There were planning permission hurdles to overcome, and hostility from some sections of the local community. But after all the difficulties, from the day he opened in 1989 he never looked back. Now two decades on, Bekash has firmly established itself as one of the leading restaurants in the area, with a very loyal clientele. The Bekash is well known all over the county of Essex, with


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