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In recent years there have been several studies of the breeding habits of Lear’s Macaw. These birds nest in cavities in sandstone cliffs, of which the two most important localities used are 38km (24 miles) apart. Searches for other nesting cliffs must continue.


to cultivate: little growth is seen during the first eight years.


Breeding


In recent years there have been several studies of the breeding habits of Lear’s Macaw. These birds nest in cavities in sandstone cliffs, of which the two most important localities used are 38km (24


44 BIRD SCENE


miles) apart. Searches for other nesting cliffs must continue. Eggs are usually laid in November or December and the last young leave the nest in April -- the month in which most young fledge. During the breeding season of 2004- 2005, an extensive search for nests was carried out. Fifty-six cavities were found occupied at Serra Branca and eleven at Toca Velha. Nine nests were monitored during the whole breeding season, and the breeding success registered was 1.22 young/monitored nest,. The population increased by about 80 individuals. Five years later, observation of nesting cavities at both sites in 2010 led to


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