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Healthcare Management


Executive summary


Global urbanization is upon us. For the first time ever, more than half of the world’s population lives in cities. That number will continue to grow as more than 5 million people move to cities every month. By 2030, it is estimated that 60 percent of all people will live in cities, compared to 1950 when just 30 percent of the population was urban.


This shift is changing our global economy and increasing competition between regions to attract the businesses, jobs and workers that will increase prosperity and create other social and economic advantages. Some cities and communities are already implementing new strategies for growth, laying the groundwork for transformation, and redefining what it means to be smarter. They are focused on implementing programs and services to improve individual and population health and productivity, to make their community a more desirable place to live and work, and to reduce the cost of doing business.


In its simplest form, individual health is determined by four factors: genetic makeup, behavior, environment and access to high-quality medical care.


In its simplest form, individual health is


Life sciences companies and research organizations are actively pursuing genetic research and the development of new products and services that affect the first factor.


The actions of cities, communities, regions and local stakeholders can influence and improve the last three factors. Those that establish the necessary infrastructure, programs and services that place citizens at their center; innovate across regions to promote healthier behavior and environments; and improve access to high quality healthcare, social programs and citizen services can improve quality of life and support economic sustainability.


This paper describes the steps cities, communities or regions of all sizes and stages of development can take to begin this transformation, and it offers examples of communities that are already on their way forward.


determined by four factors: genetic makeup, behavior, environment and access to high-quality medical care.


23


INSIGHT ON


HOSPITAL & HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT VOL. 3 ISSUE 3 August 2014


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