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58


“One of his


favourite sayings is ‘people buy people’”


Marketing you


This month, Karen Fewell looks at the job market and ‘personal branding’


LAST MONTH I WROTE ABOUT LinkedIn and shared some handy tips about how the platform works. As much as we would all like to think that just keeping our heads down and doing the work will result in career development, this just isn’t true in an extremely competitive job environment. Okay, it might work for some, but not for the majority of us. It is increasingly important for individuals to create a personal brand so that prospective employers, colleagues and, in many cases, clients can easily understand who you are. This is why I am following the LinkedIn article with some advice on personal branding.


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What is personal branding? According to Wikipedia, personal branding is: “The practice of people marketing themselves and their careers as brands. While previous self-help management techniques were about self-improvement, the personal branding concept suggests instead that success comes from self-packaging. Personal branding also involves creating an asset by defining an individual’s body, clothing, physical appearance, digital and online presence and areas of knowledge in a way leading to a uniquely distinguishable, and ideally memorable, impression.”


Be known for something


When developing a personal brand, it is important to decide what you want to be known for. Aim to become a thought leader on that topic. When you first start speaking out and sharing your view it is easy to worry about what others think. “Once you free yourself from the need


for perfect acceptance, it’s a lot easier to launch work that matters”—Seth Godin I have learnt that when you put something out there and others disagree with you, you often learn more. People raising questions around your thinking helps you to develop and build on your ideas. I used to worry about posting ideas that others disagree with, now I encourage the debate. Ultimately I want to be challenged on my views around food and digital behaviour so that my rationale becomes stronger and I perform better for my clients.


Determine your emotional appeal Many of the things that I know about marketing were drummed into me as a child by my dad. One of his favourite sayings is ‘people buy people’. He is right – when we are buying a product or service, the behaviour of people impacts our decision to buy. I encourage you to think about your ‘emotional appeal’. Think about your personality and how it affects


We have set up a new group on LinkedIn. Search for ‘We Work in the


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