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B BRIEFING


From classroom to kitchen


FCSI France’s Communication Work Group is dedicated to presenting the full scope of foodservice consulting activities to its members. Here, Sylvaine Bouquerel FCSI addresses the key issue of foodservice training regulation


C


ontinuing vocational training is a pivotal aspect of continuing


education in general, not just in foodservice. As Article L 6311-1 of the French Labour Code puts it, “continuing vocational training is there in order to promote the vocational training of industry workers, in order to allow their continued employment, to promote the development of their skills, their access to different levels of qualifi cation, to contribute to the economic and cultural development, and to secure their career paths and social advancement”. This Labour Code also requires that: The training organisation must register a statement of all delivered training programmes with the French General for Employment and Vocational Training Division (DGEFP).


The training contract should stipulate the title of the action, nature of the action, duration of the action in hours, the number of trainees, dates and places of the training provided, modules studied and price. The training programme must present the objectives, teaching methods, structure, the ways it intends to monitor its implementation and to assess all the results.


Foodservice training


If in traditional education knowledge is at the core, in continuous training sessions it is the trainee who is at the heart of the exercise. On-site training, which is what


90


FCSI consultants undertake, can follow different aspects: theoretical classroom training or practical training in the kitchen. Theoretical training presents the


new item before it is incorporated into the restaurant. It provides knowledge of the subject and would be held in a training room.


Practical training promotes the introduction of changes. It is an adaptation to the workstation. It provides operational expertise, and takes place in a training room, kitchen or restaurant. The monitoring aspect assists employees in their adaptation to changes. It provides relationship know-how; it takes place in a training room and kitchen. According to American educationalist


Edgar Dale’s ‘Cone of Experience’ (see diagram), memory results can be ranked


Cone of experience


10% 20% 30% 50% 70% 90%


of what we read of what we hear of what we see


of what we hear and see


of what we say


of what we say and do


About FCSI France FCSI France comprises 55% professional and 45% allied members. The goal of the Society is to promote professionalism in foodservice and hospitality consulting.


Its activities include publishing


technical manuals, organising professional meetings and facilitating discussions between the members and the foodservice restaurant managers.


according to the methods of learning. His research suggested that the best assessments, therefore, are to be gained when the teaching methods are based on real know-how.


Training in place Training can take place in external (inter-company training) or internal (on-site training) sessions. If the fi rst is more appropriate for the development of themes common to several institutions, such as bio-waste recovery, the second focuses exclusively on issues of a site, a team or a work area (for example, storage). This process often wins the support of employees who fi nd it addresses their day-to-day concerns. It is centered on the knowledge provided by FCSI France consultants. Training facilitates and promotes the satisfaction of employees and aids the implementation of procedures. It also helps the team to think collaboratively on how the organisation can work and how they may divide the workload. Finally it


encourages people to think about their own behaviour in the context of the wider team, and helps to reduce interpersonal tensions and increase effi ciency.


Sylvaine Bouquerel FCSI is the administrator of FCSI France. Contact: fcsifrance@fcsi.org


For more go to foodserviceconsultant.org


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