This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BLAST CHILLERS


Chefs have been warming to blast chillers in recent years, although many evangelists for the technology feel it could be more widely adopted throughout the foodservice industry. Jim Banks speaks to the experts to find how they are improving performance for chefs


method of preparing meals, whether it is in the kitchens of large institutions, banqueting facilities or fine restaurants. Cook-chill technology enables chefs to prepare meals, cool rapidly to lock in flavours, then reheat them at the right moment for service. There is little or no loss of nutritional value or flavour and food looks freshly prepared, so the preparation and cooking of meals is no longer tied to the time the food is to be served. The blast chiller is crucial as it enables the cooling process to happen in a fraction of the time that would be needed with a standard walk-in cooler. Given the advantages of blast chillers, which can also prolong the freshness of ingredients and reduce spoilage, it is no surprise that proponents of cook-chill are vocal in proclaiming its benefits, but there is a resistance to adopting a new method of cooking or an unfamiliar technology like the blast chiller. “It is often a struggle to convince


B


last chillers have fuelled the


growing interest in the cook-chill


people about the value of blast chillers,” says Reggie Daniel FCSI, foodservice consultant at Camacho Associates. “They are being used more, but not as much as they should be. In some cases it’s because people don’t know how to use them, and in others it is because the cost is high. It is a hard sell unless people see the value. “They are not just for cooling cooked


food, they can help if produce from a supplier is not at the right temperature. Usually the ingredients would be put in the walk-in cooler, but they raise the temperature inside. Similarly, bottled drinks could be stored in the dry goods area and cooled down in the blast chiller before serving,” he adds.


Where there is growth in the use of blast chillers it tends to come in sectors where a large number of meals need to be prepared, often well in advance of the time they will be consumed. Cook-chill is finding a home in big institutions. “We have been making blast chillers since 1994 and first saw a market in the healthcare sector, but now we have big customers in retail,” says James Piliero, product line manager for Traulsen. “Shopping centres are competing with restaurants as venues for dinner. Many restaurants haven’t moved into cook- chill, although some use it for their


signature services. The biggest growth is in places such as hospitals and schools, where there is a lot of batch cooking and it is important to get cold in a safe way.”


Better by design Texas-based Traulsen is a leading name in refrigeration for the foodservice market and its products are noted for their durability, efficiency and ease of use. Its range of blast chillers and quick chillers is designed to move food quickly and safely from serving temperature to storing temperature – from 135ºF to below 41ºF – in around 90 minutes. The company is focused on making its equipment more efficient, productive and user-friendly. It currently offers units that can operate 24/7 and have advanced control systems to optimise management of different zones within a freezer. Take, for example, the Traulsen blast chiller with Epicon visual interface, which can be used with manual or automatic settings to ensure high-volume production accuracy as well as improving food safety. The blast chiller can be started manually or, if preferred, automatically by inserting the Traulsen’s ProbeChill, and can run either factory default or manager-specified settings. The unit can store up to 250 recipes >


65


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com