This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
WYLIE DUFRESNE


Sample Dishes wd~50


Tasting Menu


Squash-Roasted Peanut Soup, Cockscomb, Fig Tobacco


Sweetbreads, Cucumber Lycee, Tonic, Fermented Black Bean


Shrimp Grits, Pickled Jalapeno


Ovaltine Cake, Marcona Almond, Cardamom, Sheep’s Milk


Cookie Dough Ice Cream Alder


“There are people at both restaurants whose job it is to do that – starting with the chefs and working its way down the ladder,” adds Dufresne. “When thinking of a new dish, it can sometimes start with a piece of equipment, an ingredient, a seasonal change or an idea from one of our cooks.”


Dufresne balances his time between both restaurants, although he says it’s not something he’s necessarily mastered yet, “but I do communicate with both teams on a regular basis,” he says. “As far as cooking goes, I have a regular schedule and I spend specific days at each of my restaurants, but it can, and does, change.” Mentoring his staff is vitally important not only because it is rewarding, “but also it is to your advantage to help people who work for you excel at their jobs,” he says. “Our tradition is to take new people and show them our style of cooking and bring them along on this journey. We want to give everyone the necessary tools to succeed both here at our restaurant and also for when they go on to other restaurants and endeavours.” Dufresne didn’t always want to be a


chef. Both his parents cooked and after they divorced, he spent his time between them. “They both enjoy cooking and I’ve taken a great deal away from time spent


50


with each of them in the kitchen,” he says. “As a young man I really loved sports. At a certain point though, I realised I was never going to be an athlete, but I found when I did spend time in the kitchen that it felt much like a sport to me. “Cooking is a team sport. You need each player to do their part. You prep – which is like practice. You are on your feet and sweating. Cooking is a very physical endeavour. And then it’s game time, time to serve the food to the masses.” After completing a BA in philosophy at Colby College, Maine, he returned to New York and enrolled at the French Culinary Institute. His first professional cooking job was at JoJo, run by Jean- Georges Vongerichten whom he describes as his greatest influence.


“I owe my biggest debt of gratitude to him for the impact he’s had on me and continues to have, both as a mentor and now, as a friend.” In 1998, he became chef de cuisine of Prime Steakhouse, part of the Jean- Georges group, at Bellagio, Las Vegas. “It was and still is the largest space I’ve ever overseen,” he says. “So there was a double learning curve – being in charge of a huge staff and it being an ‘away’ game. I still have friends from that era.” On his return to New York he worked


Pub Cheese, Pistachio-White Fig, Martin’s “Potato Chips”


Pigs in a Blanket, Chinese Sausage, Japanese Mustard, Sweet Chilli Sauce


Grilled Octopus, Chorizo, Sweet Potato, Banana


Rye Pasta, Shaved Pastrami


Root Beer Pudding, Smoked Cashews


Carrot Cake Sundae, Cream Cheese Ice Cream, Candied Walnuts


at 71 Clinton Fresh Food, a 30-seat restaurant, before opening wd~50 in April 2003 with partners Jean-Georges and Phil Suarez. In 2006 it received a Michelin star which it has retained every year since. “The Michelin guide is part of the group (including New York Times and New York magazine) that helps drive traffic to your restaurant,” he says. “It’s also rewarding when the efforts of the team can be acknowledged. When Michelin says you are worthy of some sort of recognition, that is really great.” While wd~50 restaurant in Clinton Street may be moving on, Dufresne’s own culinary legacy remains firmly in place.


For more go to foodserviceconsultant.org


DANIEL KRIEGER


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108