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Divining Nature: An Elemental Garden, Installation by Rebecca Kamen SCIENTIFIC


Using scientific language and materials in their work, several artists communicate complex scientific ideas in accessible, poetic and even humorous ways. Bringing biology, chemistry, and physics out of the sequestered lab, they invite us to look into how science forms our perceptions of the world.


Blood Wars by Kathy High


Rebecca Kamen and Evan Read reinter- pret knowledge garnered through life-long interests and advanced degrees in science. Inspired by the geometry and atomic number of eighty-three naturally occurring elements in the Periodic Table, Kamen’s large sculptural installation, Divining Nature: An Elemental Garden, interprets patterns observed only at the atomic level. Evan Read, a Geneticist who works for the Metropolitan Museum of Art, translates images of the subatomic into digital abstractions.


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To investigate and raise questions about the relationship of one’s identity and one’s biology, Kristen Anderson and Kathy High use actual human cells in their mixed media instal- lations. In Anderson’s God, she exhibits DNA for the part of the brain scientifically linked to spiritual experiences, and in Vindication/ Excuse, genes for dyslexia, sexual orientation, anger, obesity, and alcoholism are represented in test tubes. High’s Blood Wars is a playful and compelling project using actual cells that looks at the biological reaction of competing human white blood cells. Adrienne Klein’s Amber with Insect: Dissosteria Cardina presents itself as a beautiful specimen of amber containing strands of organic materi- al, referencing amber from distant geologic periods. The image is actually a true-sized, back-lit video of an insect captured with an ultra-high speed camera.


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