This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
54


Everyone’s a foodie these days…


… but is that necessarily a bad thing? asks Karen Fewell


I’M INTRIGUED BY THE MANY WAYS people talk about food online. This was one of the topics we discussed at the Hotelympia panel discussion ‘What is #FoodPorn doing for the hospitality industry?’ I chaired a very interesting session with the chef Tom Aikens, Daniel Doherty (Duck & Waffle), Jonathan Doughty (Coverpoint and this magazine), Ed Butcher (Square Meal) and Claire Wilson (Le Manoir). I opened the session explaining that


#FoodPorn, to me, was one of many terms that people use to describe food online. The term is often accompanied by a photo, taken on a camera phone and uploaded at the time of eating.


»


• In the UK, there have been 9.2m mentions of the word ‘food’ on Twitter


over the last year


• On Twitter, there are an average 674 tweets an hour mentioning #FoodPorn


• There are currently 29.1m Instagram images tagged as #FoodPorn


“The downside is that you can spend ages creating that beautiful dish – and then the customer’s picture can make it look terrible”


With two chefs on the panel, it only seemed right to start the debate with a discussion around chefs’ use of social media. Last year I was commissioned by Mars Foodservice in association with the Craft Guild of Chefs to conduct some research into this. The full report is available online at www.slideshare.net/ karenfewell


• 90.1% of the chefs surveyed agree that social media is a great way to increase


footfall to their establishment I often upload my speaking session presentations to www.slideshare.net/karenfewell, so feel free to take a look. * July 2014


«


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68