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Restoration


Clockwise from below: The spacious lounge area with velvet modular seating


at Bath Townhouse 14; who needs Radox when you have this lady’s calm serene


look (Townhouse 8); the first floor kitchen in Townhouse 14 is unrecognisable from its previous incarnation; a twin room in


Townhouse 14 where the beds can join to form a super king size number; even the exterior of the building hasn’t escaped the spruce up treatment


BATH TOWNHOUSE Former boozer turned quirky group holiday lets “On our first visit the property was in a very sad state having been empty for a year and suffered from break-ins and vandalism,” explains Ashley Baker, one half of the husband-and-wife team behind Queensberry Estates, who took up the challenge of transforming the Bath Tap pub on St James’s Parade. “Copper pipes had been pulled off walls causing leaks, there was rubbish everywhere, and it had that sour smell of stale beer and damp. The top three floors had not been altered from the original layout, but the ground floor and basement had many structural walls removed and most of the Georgian doors had been replaced with plain functional fire doors. “We decided to design two flats to accommodate large groups in a style that was clearly different to other properties in Bath. Our goals were to offer large lounge areas with plenty of comfortable seating; dining tables to accommodate the whole group on one table; functional but high quality bathrooms; funky design with the wow factor that also reflects the Georgian heritage of the building, and weekend rates just below a 5 star B&B while offering a lot more space to guests. “We visited some boutique hotels and


B&Bs to get ideas and my wife Jette spent hours on the internet looking for inspiration and finding fixtures and fittings that did not cost the earth and were unusual. We used local trades and suppliers wherever possible, such as Abbey Kitchens on Walcot Street, Avonvale Carpets, Bertie & Jack for pictures and frames, Silcox Son and Wicks for sofas, the list goes on . . . “We had to work within the brief


provided by B&NES historic building team to restore as much of the building as possible to its Georgian roots. Externally this meant removing all the commercial ventilation ducting, cables and pipe work. We restored the sliding sash windows, two of which had to be built from scratch. “We are so pleased with the results


we want to move in. Jette’s favourite room is the bathroom with the lady on the wall – who needs Radox with her calm, serene look? Mine is the first floor kitchen with the table for 14 made from reclaimed boards used to store cheese on and reclaimed roof rafters for the legs. This room is the most unrecognisable from its original state as a commercial kitchen.” BL


www.queensberryestates.co.uk/ self-catering-bath/


www.mediaclash.co.uk Bath Life 31


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