This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Flavours and seasonings


41


flavour Savour the


Kitchens are hotting up as Britain’s taste buds crave spicier foods, so how can caterers push for flavour?


IT’S DIFFICULT TO IGNORE THE SURGE in new and exotic flavours creeping on to menus, shelves and into cupboards recently. Flavoursome food is synonymous with provenance and the more authentic it is, the better those ordering and eating receive it. American meals, for example, have matured way beyond their standard burger and chips – people now want traditional barbecued food from the grills of the Deep South and dishes with a story to their flavour. “Classics such as ribs with barbecue sauce, lamb seasoned with rosemary and sweet with prawns always work well,” explains Marja Lawrence, operations manager for Funnybones Foodservice. “But as consumer tastes have become increasingly sophisticated, the market has seen a real appetite for new and innovative flavour combinations.”


This increased demand for more refined flavours can bring meal ideas into kitchens that are difficult for everyone to replicate. Many caterers work within comfort zones when it comes to preparing cuisine from other places, producing food that they are confident of in quality, taste and consistency. Yet if new taste trends are ignored then caterers can be left behind. “Mexican cuisine, and in particular Mexican street food, is rapidly gaining in popularity,” continues Lawrence. “More recently we’ve seen trends


becoming more regionalised, with a focus on local flavours and cuisine from various parts of both America and Mexico.” The foodservice


world is fed from high street trends, and these tend to be fast-paced and fickle, so it’s important that menus are not one step behind in the shadow of the new flavour of the season.


“The market has seen a real appetite for new and


innovative flavour combinations”


Sour, sweet and salty Regardless of what’s in fashion, flavour is the defining trait of all food, and without it the foodservice industry would be rendered futile. So it’s important that caterers do not become complicit and take the quality of a flavour for granted. “The global market for savoury flavours and seasonings has grown significantly over the last five years according to new research by RTS Resource,” comments Colin Ross, managing director of iASC Atlantic


Seafood Company. “Sour, sweet, salty and bitter have long been considered the four main flavours we can taste. To get the offering of flavours right it is important to use the best quality products made from natural ingredients.”


June 2014 *


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68