This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
FEATURE


DONATE TO OUR CONSERVATION FUND…


CLICK THE LINK BELOW: http://www.theparrotsocietyuk.org/donations.php


sixteenth century only the footless and wingless skins were known in Europe. Therefore, the representatives of this bird group were soon called ‘divine birds’ or ‘paradise birds’ as they were thought that they do not need wings at all. The skins led to the belief that the birds never landed on earth before their death but were kept permanently aloft by the plumes. Until the 18th century these stories were still believed to be true due to the lack of information about birds of paradise from the wild. Weltvogelpark Walsrode keeps some species of these famous birds of paradise. One of the larger ones is the twelve-wired Bird of Paradise (Seleucidis melanoleuca) which inhabits rain and swampy forests in lowlands of New Guinea and the western Papuan Islands. It feeds on fruits, especially the fruits of the pandanus or sago palm, but nectar, insects, frogs or lizards are also eaten. Twelve-wired birds of paradise can be very acrobatic while feeding – they can even hang upside down from branches to investigate holes in the wood for insects. The males of this species are known for their conspicuous black-olive coloured head and wing plumes as well as their brightly yellow plumes on their breast and flanks. The tail feathers, twelve blackish wire-like filaments, emerge at the rear of the plumage and can be moved independently during courtship. This species is polygynous and in the wild a single male mates with several females. To impress a female, males display on traditional, mostly dead vertical branches freed from leaves which tower above the treetops. These typical branches are even defended from


BIRD SCENE 09


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48