This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
3 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.


Healthy Head Start Project: How to Improve Indoor Air Quality for Optimal Health and Learning


CEU CODE: 467 CEU CREDIT: 0.15 LOCATION: Hyatt Regency C


This presentation will explain how to build the capacity of Head Start educators, staff, and parents/caregivers to implement and sustain strategies that reduce children's exposure to air pollutants, hazardous chemicals, environmental tobacco smoke, and pests and pesticides – all factors that cause or exacerbate asthma, allergies, and other respiratory problems among children.


Participants will…


• Demonstrate the value of building the long-term capacity of childcare center educators and parents to address children’s health through training, technical assistance, and policy development.


• Explain how to create and sustain environmental health policy for childcare centers as well as provide culturally competent technical assistance that supports implementation of policies.


• Explain how to identify environmental asthma triggers in Head Start buildings; participants will better understand the health risks associated with mold , dust, dust-mites, pests and toxic cleaners.


Laurita Kaigler-Crawlle Program Director Health Resources in Action lcrawlle@hria.org


How to Take Care of Yourself During Change and Transition


CEU CODE: 468 CEU CREDIT: 0.15 LOCATION: Hyatt Shoreline A-B


This workshop will provide participants with an opportunity to explore their numerous roles and goals while developing and plan that they can implement at work and at home to ensure that they set time aside to take care of themselves. Participants will engage in activities that will help them to understand the importance of self-care and communicating their needs to others, while maintaining their roles and responsibilities at home and work.


Participants will…


• Be able to identify the many roles they fill and identify some goals they have for these roles.


• Be able to identify challenges to reaching their goals, as well as, steps to overcome these challenges.


• Develop the start of a self-care plan that allows for participants to fulfill their roles and responsibilities while still taking time for themselves.


Sheri Marinovich


Management Systems Coordinator PACE


slewin@pacela.org


Betina Steiger Assistant Director of Direct Services PACE


bsteiger@pacela.org


How Using Parents As Teachers in Your Early Head Start Program is Working Smarter Not Harder


CEU CODE: 454 CEU CREDIT: 0.15 LOCATION: Hyatt Regency A


In this session, participants will learn how Parents as Teachers can be seamlessly incorporated in to Early Head Start. The four components of personal visits, screenings, group connections, and resourcing mirror the requirements of Early Head Start. Parents as Teachers' model allows the Parent Educator/Home Visitor to empower the family through facilitation, partnering, and reflecting.


Participants will…


• Have a clear understanding of Parents as Teachers, the four components and the approach.


• Have a clear understanding of the role of the Parent Educator/Home Visitor through partnering, reflecting and facilitating.


• Gain knowledge of how to incorporate Parents as Teachers into their home visits and socialization events.


Ann Young


Manager of Missouri Affiliations Parents As Teachers ann.young@parentsasteachers.org


William Scott Program Coordinator Parents as Teachers william.scott@parentsasteachers.org


172 National Head Start Association APRIL/MAY 2014


THURSDAY3 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.


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