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COUNTRY FOCUS


Solid state


Dr Amir Ziv Av, the Chief Scientist at the Israeli Ministry of Transport, discusses his country’s robust ITS strategy


F


rom a systems engineering perspective, National Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) are among the most to implement. ITS utilizes advanced


technologies in many fields, some of them cutting edge. Tey also incur a high level of risk due to the many stakeholders, subsystem interfaces and human behavior aspects involved. Investments in ITS projects involve a long period of time from initiation to operation, with the systems subsequently serving for many more years.


Tis article describes an ITS vision for


Israel, and suggests a methodological approach for increasing the probability for design and implementation success through the use of two key success factors: simplicity and robustness. Te proposed methodology can be


a valuable guideline to many complex technological projects, not necessarily ITS.


THE ROAD IS LONG... Tere are many Intelligent Transportation Systems deployed in Israel that encompass


various standards and technologies but do not comprise a common architecture. As a result, they cannot effectively address issues such as the congestion created by the growing rate of yearly kilometers driven as compared to roads paved. Only a comprehensive national ITS


strategy (policy and technology) that will improve infrastructure efficiency while increasing the use of public transportation can facilitate the problem-solving process. For a high probability of success, the ITS strategy must be simple, robust


This vision for Israel’s ITS strategy is based on existing technologies 52 thinkinghighways.com Vol 7 No 4 Europe/Rest of the World


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