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Traveller information


“In regions with many countries, lots of borders, boundaries and different languages, cooperation and information exchange is vital”


boundaries, and (to make it even more complicated) different languages, coop- eration and information exchange is vital. To provide multi-modal cross- border traveller information, ideally including real-time information is an aim within in the Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) region. Looking at the geographical situation, a traveller needs less than one hour by train or car from the Slovakian capital Bratislava to the Austrian capital Vienna; the trip between Budapest and Vienna takes less than 3 hours. As there are no physical barriers


hindering European travellers anymore, it is not acceptable that local or national traveller information service provision stops at the borders. There are several good examples of


local or national traveller information services existing within the aforemen- tioned region. The most famous exam- ple is the Czech traveller information portal “idos” (www.idos.cz) that pro- vides Czech-wide public transport infor- mation. It is one of the winners of EC Vice President Siim Kallas’ “First Smart Mobility Challenge”. However other


countries in the Danube region also have good examples for multi-modal travel- ler information services. In Hungary the “KIRA system”, a common and harmo- nised traffic system and database, forms the basis for several intelligent transport services including multi-modal traveller information.


AUSTRIA AS A ROLE MODEL The Austrian GIP (Graph Integration Platform), referencing the Austrian transport network, is even established by national ITS law and has been fully


Europe/Rest of the World Vol 8 No 2


thinkinghighways.com


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