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SUSTAINABILITY Electric vehicles


Charging point communication and interfaces


The other possible solution is to maximise opportun-


istic charging to allow EV drivers to charge little but often through inductive charging. Inductive charging is a method of wirelessly transferring power between two coils; a primary coil that is part of the road infrastructure and a secondary coil on the vehicle. This concept allows not only reduced charging times and extended electric-only range but also, potentially, a reduced size of on-board batteries, and there- fore, the cost of EVs. In order for this approach to be practical, a real time com-


munication link becomes even more important in order to allow wireless communication with the charging infrastruc- ture (as there is no longer a physical link). It also requires the network back office and possibly the electricity distribution network operator to monitor demand in real-time in order to mitigate any disturbances from high powered, fast switch- ing inductive chargers. Inductive chargers could be placed at locations where vehi-


cles stop for short durations, such as traffic lights, taxi ranks or bus stops. The deployment of such technologies in urban environment is currently being researched by large European research projects, including UNPLUGGED. TRL is a partner in this and other European projects actively investigating the issues and opportunities around the use of inductive charg- ing for vehicles.


INDUCTION COURSE As part of another project assessing the impact of inductive


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charging for electric buses on the distribution network in Milton Keynes, TRL has developed a set of requirements for telematics, and the data required to be exchanged between an electric bus, the inductive chargers and the distribution network. The project is still in its very early stages, but the findings so far highlight the large amount of data that would be required to implement real-time network impact moni- toring and mitigation. Taken to its extreme, the concept of inductive charging can


be expanded to include dynamic or, continuous inductive power transfer (IPT). The implementation of dynamic IPT systems is still some way off, but demonstrators are already being implemented in Europe and Asia. Such systems could have an even bigger impact but will


likely require not only capability of the vehicle to communi- cate with back office systems, infrastructure and potentially electricity distribution networks, but also to be linked to urban traffic management and control systems and highway- based network optimisation systems.


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 Denis Naberezhnykh BSc (Hons) is Senior ITS Consultant at TRL’s Sustainable Mobility Group. In April 2013 Denis Naberezhnykh was named Young ITS Professional of the Year by the members of ITS UK.


dnaberezhnykh@trl.co.ukwww.trl.co.uk


thinkinghighways.com Vol 8 No 2 Europe/Rest of the World


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