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South Africa


“The IMF report predicts that Sub-Sahara Africa’s GDP will slow to 5.8 per cent with the EU static on 1.9 per cent and the growing to 3.5 per cent and Developing Asia slowing but still on top with 7.6 per cent.”


TABLE 1 1980–89


6.7 3.1 2.6 2.2 2.1 2.1 1.3 SSA Developing Asia


1990–99 7.2


4.3 3.2 3.0 2.2 2.1 1.7 Latin America and the Caribbean


2000–11 9.0


6.0 5.3 4.5 3.9 2.0 1.9


2015 projected 7.6


5.8 4.3 4.0 3.5 3.4 1.9 Central and Eastern Europe Middle East and North Africa Source: IMF World Economic Outlook Database, October 2012 US EU


Says Punam Chuhan-Pole, a lead economist in the World


Bank’s Africa department: If properly harnessed to unleash their full potential, these


trends hold the promise of more growth, much less poverty, and accelerating shared prosperity for African countries in the foreseeable future. But World Bank economists cautioned that high inequal-


ity and a dependence on mining and mineral exports in many countries had actually dampened the poverty-reduc- ing effect of income growth. In similar vein, the “McKinsey on Africa” report (July


2010) said that the next decade will likely mark the first since the industrial revolution when emerging economies add more to global growth than all the developed countries combined. In their view, Africa will be a core part of this eco- nomic renaissance. With 20 per cent of the world’s land mass — more than


China, India, the US, Japan and most of Western Europe put together — and 15 per cent of its population, Africa is being touted as the world’s last major economically untapped region. Transport and ITS will, by definition, play a key enabling


role to realise this potential and open up new ITS markets. After playing a pioneering role to advocate greater use if ITS to maximize transport investment, ITS South Africa welcomes the formal establishment of ITS Nigeria and ITS Ethiopia to expand ITS deployment in Africa. “Though small in number and short in history, the role


Europe/Rest of the World Vol 8 No 2


of these three national ITS associations as a bridgehead in accelerating ITS deployment should not be underestimated.” The importance of transport – and specifically public


transport – and ITS as a strategic enabler is further illustrated by opening of a liaison office of the International Association of Public Transport (UITP) African Chapter (UATP) in Johannesburg, South Africa. The UATP is regularly hosting workshops, training seminars and its Regional Congress and Exhibition with the local support of ITS South Africa. South Africa is the only African country that is a member


of the G20, or the Group of Twenty Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors. South Africa hosted the BRICS Summit (with several less


publicised associated events) resulting in a number of bi- and multi-lateral agreements being signed between Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – with China promi- nent with its multi-billion Euro investments and loan agree- ments specifically in the transport and rail sector. During the BRICS Summit on 26-27 March at the Durban International Convention Center, the BRICS countries also negotiating the establishment of a BRICS Development Bank to finance transport and other infrastructure projects. Says Vorster: “Looking at the GDP figures over the past


decade or so and the growth predictions for the next couple of years, it is clear that Africa needs to be reassessed given its economic potential.” Looking at indicators to better anticipate future trends, there are several reasons why to expect positive developments


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