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COUNTRY FOCUS South Africa


The Gautrain station is Sandton, the business and corporate district of Johannesburg. The Gautrain connects Pretoria with Johannesburg and Sandton with the OR Tambo International Airport. It has 50 000 passenger trip per weekday and slightly less on weekends


South Africa: land of plenty?


South Africa is the only African country that is a member of the G20, but does that have any effect when it comes to unlocking new ITS markets? Kevin Borras talks to ITS South Africa’s CEO Dr Paul Vorster


W 42


hile a “rose is a rose” to William Shakespeare, “sustainability” is more opaque and multi- dimensional, yet it is one of the very often spe-


cific requirements when an ITS system is specified, designed and procured. Perhaps “sustainability” should also be discussed when


industry leaders gather to look at safeguarding the future of the global ITS industry? The global recession and its linger- ing aftershocks and the contraction of maturing markets in many parts of the traditional ITS markets, requires a fresh look at new and emerging ITS markets, says Dr Paul Vorster, CEO of ITS South Africa. Sub-Saharan Africa’s economic growth should accelerate


to more than 5 per cent over the next three years, far out- pacing the global average, but the region must do more to


convert this into reducing poverty, the World Bank said. In its latest Africa’s Pulse analysis of prospects for the region, the bank saw increased investment, high commodity prices and a pick-up in the global economy driving this expected growth surge in the world’s poorest continent. It said foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows to Sub-


Saharan Africa were projected to increase to record levels each year over the next three years, reaching US$54bn by 2015. This compared to US$37.7bn in 2012, a 5.5 per cent increase in a year when FDI flows for developing countries fell on average by 6.6 per cent, the bank added. The Washington-based multilateral lender predicted Sub-


Saharan Africa’s growth would be 4.9, 5.1 and 5.2 per cent for 2013, 2014 and 2015 respectively. In 2012, the region’s growth was estimated at 4.7 per cent.


thinkinghighways.com Vol 8 No 2 Europe/Rest of the World


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