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EC PROJECTS Compass4D


“The Danish pilot site is currently looking at installing cooperative systems on 90 buses and in 21 traffic signals on a central route that connects buses running between the central station and Østerport”


year before placing them on the market. Some sceptics might consider this as


a very optimistic approach, but the 33 partners involved are confident that this will happen. A group of these partners is already working on an early version of the business model that will define the structure of the final one, which will be updated according to the experiences encountered over the three years. The fundamental element is to find a balance between the unquestionable enthusiasm of the partners involved and keeping the business aspect at heart. All the experi- enced members of the consortium know this very well; the Compass4D business model will consider the current state of the market, analyse existing models and foresee the future market situation. Not least, Compass4D will identify deploy- ment barriers and propose solutions to them, for example to the user acceptance, the cost models, and the business cases.


BEYOND EUROPE International cooperation is one of the key aspects to reach interoperability of services and achieve economies of scale more quickly, thus reducing costs. That is why a relevant part of Compass4D is looking at a close cooperation with the


Compass4D partners visit to the pilot site of Copenhagen


USA and Japan on reaching interoper- ability and harmonisation of services. A Compass4D delegation recently visited Ann Arbor, Michigan, to exchange best practices and participated in the Global Symposium on Cooperative Vehicle and Infrastructure. They were given the opportunity to visit the US pilot site where 2,800 vehicles have already been equipped with C-ITS services. Deployment barriers, user acceptance, adoption of standards, validation of the


Compass4D services The Road Hazard Warning (RHW) service will reduce road collisions by sending drivers warning messages which would raise their attention level, and can also inform drivers of what the most appropriate behaviour would be in relation to the hazards they faced. The Red Light Violation Warning (RLVW) service will increase drivers’ alertness at signalised intersections in order to reduce the number and severity of collisions. Although the focus of the service is on red light violations, the service also addresses situations involving emergency vehicles as well as the various right of way rules. The Energy Efficient Intersection Service (EEIS) will reduce energy use and vehicle emissions at signalised intersections. The major advantage of a cooperative EEIS using infrastructure-to-vehicle communication is the availability of “signal phase and timing information” (SPaT) in the vehicle. To find out more about Compass4D services, visit the website, www.compass4d.eu


36 thinkinghighways.com


equipment, interoperability, costs and sustainability of services are just few of the topics that Compass4D is discuss- ing with partners on the other side of the globe. Further similar activities are already planned for October 2013 in Tokyo during the ITS World Congress. Anyone who is interested in knowing


more about Compass4D should come to Dublin to the ITS European Congress 2013 where a Special Interest Session (SIS13) on Wednesday 5 June will be fully dedicated to cities currently deploy- ing cooperative systems. And of course the final event in Bordeaux in 2015 at the 22nd ITS World Congress will give you the chance to see for yourself if Compass4D has kept its promises.


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 Carla Coppola is Communications Officer, ERTICO – ITS Europe and Dissemination Manager responsible for Compass4D communications


c.coppola@mail.ertico.comwww.compass4d.eu  @Compass4D


Vol 8 No 2 Europe/Rest of the World


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