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EC PROJECTS Compass4D


Cooperative systems in everyday life


Carla Coppola looks at a project that emphasises the potential for the use of cooperative services


W


hen talking about a European project, especially if it is on much-vaunted topics such


as cooperative systems, road safety, or energy efficiency, I can clearly picture many readers rolling their eyes and thinking “not again”. If the need for serv- ices that allow us to drive safely, comfort- ably and by consuming less fuel is widely acknowledged, the concrete means – namely projects – used to achieve these purposes are less likely to be unani- mously appreciated. Nevertheless not all the projects are the same and some of them can really make the difference for society as well as paving the way to new market opportunities. Compass4D is a straightforward


project that does exactly what it claims: it deploys cooperative services in specific roads to reduce the number of incidents at intersections and reduce fuel con- sumption (and therefore carbon emis- sions). The term “deployment” (“4D” stands for “for deployment”) clearly indi- cates that the boundaries of research have been overcome and that we are now in a pre-market phase. The numbers from Compass4D – far


from being definitive – are also very impressive: 540 drivers will use 334 vehicles including private (cars, taxis and trucks) and public (buses and emer- gency vehicles) means of transport in seven cities across Europe. The cities selected for the pilot sites are Bordeaux (France), Copenhagen (Denmark), Helmond (Netherlands), Newcastle (UK), Thessaloniki (Greece), Verona (Italy) and Vigo (Spain), are all advanced in terms of cooperative systems deploy- ment as well as willing to further invest in road safety, energy efficiency and con- gestion reducing measures.


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Compass4D consortium City of Copenhagen; City of Helmond; Newcastle City Council; City of Vigo; City of Verona; Region of Central Macedonia; Centre for Research and Technology Hellas – CERTH; Automotive Technological Centre of Galicia – CTAG; Equipos de Señalizacion y Control – ESYCSA; ERTICO – ITS Europe; EUROTAXI; Federation Internationale de l’Automobile – FIA; GEOLOC Systems; Institute of Communication and Computer System – ICCS; IDIADA Automotive Technology; French Institute of Science and Technology, Developments and Networks – IFSTTAR; IMTECH Traffic & INFRA BV; INFOTRIP; IRU Projects; MAT Traffic; Traffic, Ministere de l’Ecologie, du Développement Durable et de l’Energie – MEDDE; Peek Traffic BV; PEEK Denmark; Siemens; Swarco Mizar; Telecom Italia; TOPOS Aquitaine; TNO; University of Newcastle; Vialis; Vitrasa; Volvo; V-TRON.


HOW DOES IT WORK? Compass4D is setting up three services (Road Hazard Warning – RHW; Red Light Violation Warning – RLVW; and Energy Efficient Intersection – EEI) based on an architecture built mainly on V2I communications between On Board Units (OBU), Road Side Units (RSU) and Traffic Management Centres (TMC) in the pilot sites. The project officially started five months ago with Vigo being the first city to host the kick-off meeting and first gathering of the consortium. Vigo will install OBUs in 10 private cars, 20 buses, two emergency vehicles and eight taxis making a total of 40 vehicles. The Compass4D Spanish route crosses


the entire city centre with 17 equipped intersections and it connects two of the


thinkinghighways.com


Geographical spread of the 33-partner Compass4D consortium


main entrances to the city; the AP-9 and A-55 highways. This means that once the installation is complete, Vigo will have a fully equipped area that covers both urban and interurban locations. In April, it was time to visit Copen–


hagen. The Danish pilot site is currently looking at installing cooperative systems on 90 buses and in 21 traffic signals on a central route that connects buses running between the central station in the city cen- tre, and the East Gate Station (Østerport), the hub for regional, commuter and S-trains and, from 2018, a metro system. These meetings are very important as the partners actually see where the RSU will be built, have a clear picture of how the three services will work and adapt the technologies according to the city needs.


Vol 8 No 2 Europe/Rest of the World


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