This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
COUNTRY FOCUS Ireland


“There is a disconnect between the land-based ITS transport systems and that of the sea and rail fright transport systems... a sector of traffic management that Ireland could improve upon”


became accustom to the additional services provided to them, and quite often it can be an on-going challenge to deliver and improve on these services. Local Authorities are in the business of providing for their citizens. With the advances in smart phone technology and interactive mobile phone apps, it can be the general public that drives the expectation placed upon the local authorities. This is a seismic shift in how local authorities used to carry out their business.


SAFE IN THE CITY There has been a drastic reduction in the number of road fatalities in Ireland in the last decade. Dublin City is cur- rently the safest of all EU capital cities with regard to road safety. Other road safety measures that have also been fun- damental to this success include the introduction of a pen- alty points system (2002), random breath testing (2006), and safety (speed) camera systems (2010). Year on year reduc- tions in road fatalities have been observed in the last decade. Road fatalities in 2003 stood at 335. This compared to 161 in 2012 represents an improvement far beyond any forecasted projections. The Irish law enforcement authority, An Garda Siochana, have been instrumental in achieving this reduc- tion, and the continued consolation between themselves and other transport stakeholders has be a key element to the suc- cess. While ITS technologies can not be attributed entirely with this success, it is believed it played a vital role. As an island nation, Ireland is remote from the European


mainland. This acts as a geographical barrier to the devel- opment of self sustainable systems. The country has an export-led economy, however the focus on value for money and sustainable growth are key to the development of ITS in Ireland. At present there is a disconnect between the land- based ITS transport systems and that of the sea and rail fright


32


transport systems. This is a sector of traffic management that Ireland could improve upon. Ireland could also invest more resources into investigating


the benefits ITS can bring to the reduction of air transport pollutants. Urban Traffic Control (UTC), a key component of ITS systems, by their nature aim to reduce congestion through promoting the smooth flow of traffic. Given that vehicles emit more airborne pollutants while in congestion situations, more emphasis should be place into assessing the tangible benefits that ITS can achieve by reducing this stop/ start nature of traffic patterns. There are a number of national forums that help pool the


knowledge and experience of Local Authorities, and ITS Ireland has led the development of closer ties between pub- lic and private organisations in the field of ITS. Other issues that could be beneficial to Local Authorities could include the improvement of data transfer between local authority to local authority, and local authority to government agencies. This would allow the sharing of information such as traffic vol- umes which could feed into local and national spatial strategy plans. Local authorities could assist each other more through the sharing of experiences with regard to ITS deployments.


||||||||||||||||| |||||||||||||||| ||||||||||||||||


 Martin Maycock is Executive Board Member at ITS Ireland and Transport Engineer at South Dublin County Council. Donal Hodgins is International Liasion Officer at ITS Ireland and Senior Executive Engineer at Kildare County Council


mmaycock@SDUBLINCOCO.ie dhodgins@kildarecoco.ie


www.sdcc.ie www.kildare.ie thinkinghighways.com Vol 8 No 2 Europe/Rest of the World |||||||||||||||||


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84