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TECHNOLOGY Managed Motorways


“A service-oriented modular architecture enables STREAMS to be continuously and easily upgradeable. New services directly replace older identical services with a minimal impact on other services”


urban and arterial roads, incident man- agement, provision of up to the minute traveller information along with com- plementary and well-developed analysis tools to enable historical evaluation of motorway performance. The feature-rich STREAMS ITS


Platform integrates managed motor- ways, incident and event management, urban traffic control, real time traveller information, parking guidance, network video management, system interfaces such as a STREAMS interface to SCATS®, construction site management, emer- gency vehicle pre-emption and business analysis tools. A service-oriented modular archi-


tecture enables STREAMS to be con- tinuously and easily upgradeable. New services directly replace older identical services with a minimal impact on other services. Algorithms within the major services are also replaceable and multiple algorithms can be included and switched at run time if required. The system is fully scalable from small towns to large cities. In addition, the STREAMS user interface is simple, elegant and comprehensive. It consists of interactive street directory style maps, schematics and fully custom- isable spreadsheets for detailed data. The single user interface simplifies staff train- ing and reduces operator errors. In addition to achieving award-win-


ning results for the managed motor- ways system, another unique feature of STREAMS is its rules-based incident response functionality. Traditional inci- dent response systems typically need more than 20,000 pre-defined response plans. Many more plans are needed if secondary incidents are addressed. These plans are developed manually and are very expensive to produce. Policy changes such as a speed limit change often necessitate changes to thousands of plans, so also very expensive to maintain.


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Managing motorways is simplified with STREAMS, and delivers significant improvements in traffic management


In practice, pre-defined plans often


don’t match the particular incident circumstances so typical traffic man- agement centre responses include a mix of pre-defined plans and manu- ally implemented controls. The result is that authorities typically specify that responses should be achieved in less than 15 minutes. STREAMS incident response does not


use pre-defined incident response plans. All response plans are generated auto- matically using approximately 20 basic traffic engineering rules and the system’s embedded geographic information sys- tem. Major incident responses such as the closure of a motorway can be fully implemented in less than 10 seconds. It is also possible to implement policy changes within seconds through a simple


thinkinghighways.com


change to the relevant rule. Traffic management centre operators


simply identify the location and nature of the incident to initiate a response. The system then generates and implements the appropriate response plan automati- cally. If secondary incidents occur, the additional incident details are provided and the system automatically adjusts the planned response to cater for the new circumstances. Fast and consist- ent responses are achieved with a major reduction in an operator’s workload.


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 Jason Wagstaff is Chief Operating Officer of Transmax


jason.wagstaff@transmax.com.auwww.transmax.com.au


Vol 8 No 2 Europe/Rest of the World |||||||||


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