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Transportation accessibility


“Within the planning community, there is a large variance in the extent to which agencies are utilizing accessibility metrics in their activities”


Looking into the future, might transportation agencies


transform and expand their traditional roles? There has been a steady, albeit slow, trend to recognize the importance of multi-modal solutions. But why stop with the movement of people and goods? If the movement of information can often be an effective substitute, why not include promotion of telework and other demand reduction strategies within the purview of transportation agencies? Ultimately, these agencies could transform into what Bren-


don Slotterback, a Minnesota planner and analyst, has called “Departments of Accessibility” focused on ensuring efficient access to goods and services, whether through mobility, proximity (through land use planning), or alternatives such as movement of information. It may be a pipe dream, but not long ago, it was a pipe dream that electric companies would actively encourage conservation and reduction of demand. These days, this is a standard element of the metrics and actions for regulated utilities.


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 Mike McGurrin is a senior fellow for transportation systems at Noblis. The views and opinions expressed are the author’s own, and do not reflect Noblis’ position, strategy, or opinions.


mike.mcgurrin@noblis.orgwww.noblis.org


 Additional information on the University of Minnesota’s Access to Destinations research program can be found at http://www.cts.umn.edu/access-study/.


The Brookings Institution’s groundbreaking study Where the Jobs Are: Employer Access to Labor by Transit may be found at http://www.brookings.edu/ research/papers/2012/07/11-transit-jobs-tomer.


Information on the open source tool OpenTripPlanner Analyst can be found at http://openplans.org/case- study/opentripplanner-analyst/


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Pictured: Permanent installation at the on-ramp to the Victoria Park Tunnel in Auckland New Zealand. visit us at versilis.com today for more information. North America Vol 8 No 3 thinkinghighways.com 41


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