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All-electronic tolling


“On average, AET systems can expect less than one per cent of toll avoidance when there is enforceable legislation. The GEB project has less than half of a percent”


failure to pay open road toll. This type of legislation constrains the owner of the vehicle and potentially stops them from driving under the toll facility. In British Columbia, Section 26(1)(e)


(f) of the Motor Vehicle Act of British Columbia – Refusal to issue a licence, permit, etc. – states that “The Insur- ance Corporation of British Columbia may, without a hearing, refuse to issue a driver’s licence to a person who (e) is indebted to a concessionaire or the bill- ing organization for an excessive toll debt, as those terms are defined in the Transportation Investment Act, (f) is indebted to the authority, a subsidiary or a billing organization for an excessive toll debt, as those terms are defined in the South Coast British Columbia Transpor- tation Authority Act, (f.1) is indebted to the authority, as that term is defined in the South Coast British Columbia Trans- portation Authority Act, under section 250 of that Act. The collection results on the GEB


project of having the Motor Vehicle Act Section 26(1) (e) (f) in effect is a 95.13 per cent collection within the first 120 days. After a second notification, another 1.35 per cent was collected, bringing the total to 96.48 per cent collected in the first year. A small percentage can potentially stay


under receivable status and may not be subject to the above legislation immedi- ately, until the minimum balance thresh- old for a toll debt is breached. The remainder can be attributed to


accountholders who choose not to have their vehicle or license plate registration renewed.


NOTE 1 (Source: TollRoadNews)


North America Vol 8 No 3


Vancouver’s Golden Ears Bridge: customers can set up postpaid accounts


Due Date -0


0-30


31-60 61-90


91-120


121-150 151-180 181-270 271-365 366-730 731+


% Outstanding 84.88% 3.52% 2.59% 2.31% 1.83% 0.32% 0.20% 0.44% 0.39% 1.10% 2.42%


2. Limited collectability of out of state/ province transactions Even with legislation there is a risk on collectability from vehicles that are out- side of the Agency’s jurisdiction. On a community bridge such as the


GEB, out-of-province users constitute less than one percent of Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT). In the ATI Hub Pilot project, in which


six agencies from various states par- ticipated, over 1m toll transactions were matched within a three-month period but remained uncollected. There are two solutions on the rise, to


improve collection of out-of-state/prov- ince transactions.


thinkinghighways.com


One is toll enforcement reciprocity.


In the United States, the New England States of Massachusetts, Maine and New Hampshire have collaborated to collect out-of-jurisdiction transactions. They have agreed to treat one another’s toll violators according to local toll enforce- ment rules. The reciprocity agreement calls for sanctions on motorists who use toll roads but fail to pay tolls and ignore late notices.1 The second is regional interoper-


ability, as observed in North Carolina, whereby the Agency has opened their toll road network to E-ZPass and Sun- Pass accountholders. Other variables on collectability can be attributed to system limitations and environmental challenges. With appropriate toll enforcement leg-


islation and a solution to collect out of state/province transactions, Agencies can effectively minimize their revenue risk.


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 Rosa C Rountree is CEO and General Manager of Egis Projects Canada


rcrountree@egiscanada.cawww.egis-projects.com


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