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INFRASTUCTURE Asset optimisation Source: Infrastructure productivity: How to save $1 trillion a year. McKinsey Global Institute (2013)


Comparison of returns for different road investments


Many types of intelligent traffic systems offer a superior benefit-to-cost ratio than the physical expansion of roads


Transport Systems (ITS), as demonstrated by the Figure below. In addition to reducing reliance on building addi- tional capacity, smart infrastructure technologies also offer a much lower capital and investment cost. For example, the cost of the transport technology solution on the UK’s M42 motorway was US$150m and took two years to implement; widening the road to produce the same outcome would have taken 10 years and cost US$800m. Other studies have also suggested that using smart transport technologies for roads, rail, airports and ports can double or triple asset utilisation


SUMMARY Cities around the world are anticipated to benefit from the use of smart technologies, but they must first overcome a number of challenges to improve infrastructure resil- ience and reliability. The deployment of these technologies, complemented by appropriate governance and regulatory changes, will deliver substantial benefits through improved city management systems, better-informed consumers and enhanced connectivity between vital infrastructure systems Whilst decision makers and leaders who run the world’s


cities are increasingly recognising the role of smart technolo- gies in ‘sweating of assets’, deployment at a global scale is still in its infancy. As this article shows, the benefits of invest- ing in smart systems are compelling, particularly given the improvements that could be made in terms of providing innovative solutions to lift our economic efficiency and liv- ing standards. To spur change programs and capture potential savings,


we must move beyond a project-by-project view and upgrade systems for planning, operating, and delivering smart infra- structure. This sort of investment will give our cities an


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opportunity to modernise their infrastructure and help drive economic growth and create jobs for the 21st century.


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 Dr Hussein Dia is Associate Professor – Transport Engineering at Swinburne University of Technology Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences in Hawthorne, Victoria, Australia


HDia@swin.edu.auwww.swinburne.edu.au


REFERENCES 1 Urban world: Mapping the economic power of cities. http://www.mckinsey.com/mgi/


2 United Nations Road Safety Collaboration. http://www. who.int/roadsafety/en/


3 Road Safety Fund. http://www.roadsafetyfund.org/ Documents/road_safety_fund_prospectus_lr.pdf


4 World Health Organisation. http://www.who.int/ mediacentre/factsheets/fs358/en/index.html


5 European Commission. http://ec.europa.eu/transport/ strategies/facts-and-figures/transport-matters/index_ en.htm


6 ITS America. http://documents4sharing.itsa.wikispaces. net/file/view/What+is+ITS.pdf


7 International Transport Forum. http://www. internationaltransportforum.org/Pub/pdf/10Outlook.pdf


8 The Economic Benefits of Intelligent Technologies. http:// www.accesseconomics.com.au/


9 Smart 2020: Enabling the low carbon economy in the information age. http://www.smart2020.org/


10Infrastructure productivity: How to save $1 trillion a year. http://www.mckinsey.com/


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