This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
FRAME


“Since the FRAME Architecture is intended for use within the European Union it consists only of user needs and a functional viewpoint ”


• Support for Law Enforcement – for regulations affecting road use


• Freight and Fleet Management • Support For Cooperative ITS


Since the FRAME Architecture is intended for use within the European Union, it consists only of user needs and a functional viewpoint, and does not mandate any physical or organizational structures on its users.


FRAME Architecture in European Policy For many years the European Commission has been looking for the basis for deployment interoperable ITS services. As a result the ITS Action Plan (2008) and the ITS Directive (2010) are the first documents which aim to define the necessary measures to develop an EU ITS Framework Architecture. In particular Action 2.3 from the ITS Action Plan and actions from the priority areas II: “Continuity of traffic and freight management ITS services” (action 1.1/1.5) and from priority area IV: “Linking the vehicle with the transport infrastruc- ture” (action 1.1/1.2) from the ITS Directive. 4, 5 Since FRAME Architecture was funded from the begin-


ning from the European Commission budget it conse- quently seems to be natural candidate for use as the EU ITS Framework Architecture. Indeed Action 2.3 from6


aims to


”define, adopt and support the deployment of a multimo- dal European ITS Framework architecture, based notably on the FRAME model and the results of E-FRAME project (2008–11).”


RESULTS OF FRAME ITS ARCHITECTURE The FRAME architecture can be used the same way as sys- tems in system theory or systems engineering. The inputs are


the stakeholder aspirations and the output is the result of the FRAME transformation process7


. Inputs are a structure consisting of a set of Stakeholder


Aspirations Sa={x1, x2,…, xn}. Outputs are a collection of results from FRAME Architecture Rs={Sb, Dp, Oi, Cs, Cr, CBa, Ra}, where: Sb – System boundary, Dp – Deployment programme, Oi – Organisational issues, Cs – Component specification, Cr – Communication requirements, CBa – Cost/Benefit analysis, Ra – Risk analysis.


System boundary System boundary is what is inside the system. The system boundary encompasses subsystems and modules. In the Systems Engineering field these are called components. “A software component is a unit of composition with a con- tractually specified interface and explicit context dependen- cies only.8


These interfaces create a boundary of the system.


Interfaces are defined by the physical data flows between system and external entities called terminators/actors. Each terminator has its own defined areas of responsibility that are outside the scope of the system.


Deployment programme The Deployment programme often contains mitigation strategies and is the way to get from legacy systems (if they exist) to the intelligent transportation vision. From figure 1 overleaf it can be seen that the most impor-


tant stage is the interim which is the precisely defined tran- sition based on the ITS architecture that contains what is needed to implement the vision. This ITS architecture needs to be used to produce software or hardware com- ponent specification that fulfils the requirements that the vision contains.


Europe/Rest of the World Vol 8 No 3


thinkinghighways.com


59


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92