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ITS ARCHITECTURE FRAME


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Marek Litwin and Krzysztof Modelewski explain how the FRAME Architecture can be seen as a decision support tool for transportation planners, transportation engineers, IT and ITS engineers and decision-


he use of information and communication tech- nologies in road transport has progressed remark- ably during last 40 years. Intelligent Transportation


Systems (ITS) are seen as a powerful tool to provide sustaina- ble growth. ITS has become more effective, and this is why it is being deployed in very many parts of the world. As ITS has become more advanced it has become more difficult to man- age in a cost-effective way, especially in the context of main- tenance. Many of today’s ITS deployments are not open and do not provide geographic continuity and interoperability. The solution for this problem is strategic planning which


allows control over and easy planning of expenditure. This approach is based on the European Framework ITS Architecture – FRAME, which can be used as a model of any ITS deployment and a guide for decision makers, contractors and system engineers. FRAME is expressed in terms of user needs and functional requirements gathered into consistent groups. FRAME also offers support for organizational issues, cost/benefit analysis, risk analysis, communication require- ments, deployment programme, component specification and for defining the system boundary, ie what is in the ITS deployment and what is not (see Thinking Highways Europe/ Rest of the World edition, November/December 2010).


TRANSPORTATION PLANNING Planning is an integral part of the decision-making process. Plans establish a context in which we anticipate when and where future developments will occur. With funding con- straints, plans tell a region what it can afford, and what it can- not. Transportation planning is an important part of defining a vision for the future and of establishing strategic transpor- tation investment and system operation directions…1 the defined area. ITS enhances “traditional transportation”


for


by means of ICT technologies. This technological addition requires a new approach for decision making process sup- port because of the different lifetimes of the projects, greater number of stakeholders and the necessary ICT knowledge required for more complicated problem solving. However, the basics of the planning process are the same


for ITS and “traditional transportation” and in each case it is to generate information useful to decision makers for the specific types of decisions they are facing. The scope of ITS projects vary widely from national level to specific ITS services. This is why it is necessary to have different kinds of strategies for different types of planned ITS implementations.


FRAME ITS ARCHITECTURE What is the FRAME Architecture? The European ITS Framework Architecture (often called “FRAME”) is the result from Framework Programme projects funded by the European Commission since 1998. Since that time FRAME has been continuously enhanced – with cooperative systems being added by the E-FRAME project (2008-11)2 lowing areas of ITS3


. The FRAME Architecture covers the fol- :


• Electronic Fee Collection – enables the acceptance of pay- ment for services provided by other areas of ITS


• Emergency Notification and Response – enables the Emergency Services to respond to incidents.


• Traffic Management • Public Transport Management – for road based services only


• Support for Host Vehicle Services – some aspects of Cooperative ITS


• Traveller Journey Assistance – trip planning and trip related traveller information


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thinkinghighways.com


Vol 8 No 3 Europe/Rest of the World


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