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South Africa


transport. Hence, new, integrated road-based public trans- port networks, in combination with the expansion of the existing Integrated Rapid Public Transport Networks, need to be developed.


Strengthening Freight Hubs Transportation of freight is a vital element in planning for prosperity. The overarching objective of all freight transport is economic efficiency of the movement of goods. Freight transport policy and investment is primarily directed at cre- ating conditions that support that objective. In South Africa, a very large proportion of freight transport movement is pro- vided by state owned entities responsible for railways, ports, pipelines and air transport. Gauteng experiences a number of constraints from a freight logistics perspective such as overloading and supply chain constraints. These constraints can be limited through the expansion of existing and the development of new logistics infrastructure.


Customer check in with smart cards into the pre- boarding area of a Rea Vaya station, ready for rapid boarding the moment the bus arrives


Travel Demand Management – Making Smarter Travel Choices The ITMP25 highlights the fact that even with significant interventions in the provision of transport infrastructure and services, the on-going growth in population and expected long term growth in the economy, coupled with rising motor- isation, will put significant strain on the province’s transport system. In addition to investing into the supply side of the transport system, it will be very critical to manage demand through focused transport demand management (TDM) interventions. The myriad of available TDM strategies has a modest impact individually, but the cumulative impact of a comprehensive TDM programme can be significant.


Rea Vaya BRT bust at station, showing the level entrance from the station directly into the bus


largely support apartheid policies and settlement patterns. These service networks, with the exception of the BRT sys- tems, are still based on planning done by operators in isola- tion from one-another to maximise their market share and income and not necessarily for the convenience of com- muters. This has left commuters with bus and taxi services that are unsafe, unreliable and often inaccessible. The costs associated with these services are also high and burdensome, particularly for the poor. To build a more sustainable urban environment, with


less congestion and lower emission of gasses harmful to the environment, a more efficient road-based public trans- port system is required, which would attract more travellers (with the choice of using their private vehicles) to use public


Europe/Rest of the World Vol 8 No 3


Continued Sustainable Province-wide Mobility This century will for the first time see over half the world’s population living in cities. Making these cities environmen- tally, economically and socially sustainable and liveable is one of today’s great challenges. In order to ensure sustainable urban mobility in Gauteng a range of inter-related measures designed to satisfy the mobility needs of residents and busi- ness will need to be implemented. The spatial characteristics of the urban form in the prov-


ince dictate that significant investment will be required in both public transport (road and rail) and road infrastructure, as neither will on their own be able to provide the required mobility for its residents and economy. As a cross-cutting thrust, the ITMP25 report tables the fol-


lowing as practical ITS recommendations: • Establish a Provincial Transportation Management Centre (TMC), with communication linkages to National and Metro TMCs.


• Establish provincial communications backbone infra- structure that links TMCs.


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