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South Africa


“Congestion and lack of mobility will impact negatively on the movement of people, goods and services; the economy and the quality of life will deteriorate”


An analysis of the projected transport situation in 25-years’ time, shows that the consequences or cost of “doing nothing” will be severe. • Vehicle population predicted to grow from 3.65m to 6.57m.


• Peak hour person trips to grow from 2.2m to 3.9m. • Average peak hour road network speed will reduce from 48km/h to below 10km/h.


• Average public transport travel speed will decline from 38km/h to below 14km/h.


The inevitable result is that a gridlock will eventually choke the transport network. Congestion and lack of mobility will impact negatively on the movement of people, goods and services; the economy and the quality of life will deteriorate.


Customer service staff member at one of Johannesburg’s Rea Vaya BRT stations


of freight from road to rail is a key departure point, which includes the focus on the development of major rail-based freight logistic hubs, located on the periphery of the core urban areas. The ITMP25 report says that every year a bigger percent-


age of the world’s population lives in an urban setting, and the rate of urbanisation exceeds the rate at which a city’s infrastructure and transport network can be expanded. With transport as a major contributor to CO2


emissions,


a “greener” propulsion is promoted, especially for public transport vehicles. Having sustainable transport, inter alia, requires that society: • Reduce travel: change travel patterns such as the regular- ity and extent of travel specifically in peak periods and trip lengths.


• Promote a shift in transport modes from motorised to non- motorised trips; private to public transport; and road to rail.


• Use “Smart Technologies” • Implement environmentally friendly technologies such as cleaner fuels; and


• Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) such as traveller information to better plan trips, routes and travel times and to reduce congestion through active travel demand management (TDM).


Europe/Rest of the World Vol 8 No 3


POSITIVE THINKING Vorster says that there are four positive aspects to the plan. “Firstly, it proposes a long-term solution. The 25-year


planning horizon is welcome because of the inherent link- age between transportation and land use policies and both require a long-term approach. Creating new transport infrastructure and modal re-alignment needs sufficient planning and implementation time frames to become effective,” he says. Secondly, the ITMP adopts a holistic approach. “The draft


ITMP25 report incorporates land-use and housing as part of its scope of recommendations. Urban sprawl and expanding the urban edge of metropolitan areas instead of densification and in-filling to accommodate growth and inbound migra- tion have to be managed as integral to transport planning, with an emphasis on developing transport corridors and the provision of rapid public transport systems.” Thirdly, it aims to achieve a better-balanced transport


network for the Gauteng Province. “The IMP25 aggressively promotes the currently insufficient public transport network, encourages non-motorised transport and will encourage rail as the back-bone of the transport network and it promotes a re-look of freight and logistics as part of the transport mix,” notes Vorster. Fourthly, the IMPT25 report aims to introduce increasingly


smart solutions. By recognising ITS as a cross-cutting thrust it will encourage the development and deployment of innovative


thinkinghighways.com 43


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