This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
COUNTRY FOCUS South Africa


Master key T


he 25-year Integrated Transport Master Plan (ITMP25) for South Africa’s most populous prov- ince, Gauteng, is a strategic intervention that cannot


have waited any longer. Its implementation will help to halt the decline in the transport system and pave the way for the much needed turnaround to restore mobility, says ITS South Africa’s CEO, Dr Paul Vorster. “The inclusion of ITS as a cross-cutting thrust impacting


on all other transport modes and functions will help to solve transport challenges by increasingly making use of ‘smart’ solutions,” he explains. Asked by Thinking Highways to reflect on the ITMP25


report recently released for comment by transport stakehold- ers, Vorster said that one of the recommendations that will have an immediate beneficial impact to promote improved integration and more synergy in transport planning is the proposed transport authority for Gauteng. The smallest province in South Africa, Gauteng takes up


only 1.4 per cent of the country’s land area but has the larg- est population of all the provinces, with 12.3m people, or 22.4 per cent of South Africa’s total population. The population in Gauteng is expected to number 18.7m by 2017 and the pov- ince has a current population density of 658 people per square kilometre. The province is crucial to the South African econ- omy, generating more than 33.9 per cent of its GDP. Land use is characterised by low density and urban sprawl. Vehicle and population growth, aggravated rapid urbani-


sation and a 30-year lag in creating new transport infrastruc- ture and insufficient attention to maintenance, has resulted in the inevitable conclusion that the “Do Nothing” scenario is simply not an option. A comprehensive transport demand model was developed


for the 25-year plan, in parallel to the development of the Gauteng Transport Implementation Plan (GTIP5) as the short-term implementation plan as part one of the ITMP25. The key inputs and the main drivers of this model were: • Demographic and economic forecasts; • Spatial development and land use changes – looking at how the Gauteng Global City Region developed in recent years and how is it likely to change in future;


• Functional transport network plans for rail, public trans- port, freight and roads; and


• Interventions with a focus on land use, public transport, non-motorised transport (NMT) and freight.


42


ITS South Africa’s Paul Vorster says that the Integrated Transport Master Plan will make the country’s transport work smarter. Kevin Borras reports


Fare gates where EMV-compliant smart cards will be used, interoperable between the varous BRT systems in deployment


The GTIP5 has identified a number of key initiatives and projects for implementation to achieve immediate impact. It consists of three types of initiatives and projects, namely: • Key short-term initiatives which will alleviate “bottle- necks” in the short- to medium-term;


• Key transport capital projects to be supported in the short to medium term; and


• Lists of all approved transport capital projects on budgets of government departments, agencies and entities.


The implementation of the GTIP5 initiatives is focused on infrastructure optimisation, integration of operations and environmental awareness.


PUBLIC TRANSPORT PRIORITY The 25-year Integrated Transport Master Plan continues where the GTIP 5 left off and key to the ITMP25 is to priori- tise public transport with the rail system being the backbone of the network. This will enable a shift from private vehicles to public


transport and NMT that will reduce congestion, enhance efficiency and promote sustainability. This means planning for the transport of people and considering person trips, as opposed to vehicle trips. Freight rail and the movement


thinkinghighways.com Vol 8 No 3 Europe/Rest of the World


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92