This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
TECHNOLOGY Autonomous vehicle sensors


“This experiment represents a further step towards totally autonomous driving in any situation”


the vehicle defines its future trajectory considering information such as GPS map, lane markings, possible obstacles in its path. At the same time it defines its speed profile based on road geometry, obstacle presence while, of course, also respecting speed limits. This experiment represents a further


step towards totally autonomous driv- ing in any situation, but the system actu- ally implemented on the test car is not currently able to handle some common situations in an optimal way, such as for example large roundabouts, merging into high-speed roads, multiple traffic lights, and road works. The current version of the software manages roundabouts and road merging in a conservative way: the vehicle comes to a complete stop before entering into the roundabout and before merging into other roads.


VEHICLE SENSORS Many different sensors are installed on the vehicle, but not all were used in July’s test. The sensors used were: • Two frontal cameras locate obstacles (pedestrians, bicycles, other vehicles) on the path, locate and interpret traffic lights, determine the position of lane markings, and reconstruct the terrain profile lateral cameras together with lateral laser scanners handle merging and roundabouts;


• A frontal laser scanner together with two lateral laser scanners locate lateral objects (like nearby vehicles, barriers, tunnel sides);


• Backward-looking cameras locate vehi- cles in adjacent lanes.


The sensors installed on the prototype include two different technologies:


NOTE 1 (www.vislab.it/3dv)


40


cameras and lasers, which complement each other in a very straightforward way. The frontal vision system, based on the real-time processing of two images coming from two synchronized cam- eras, provides terrain estimation in front of the vehicle and at the same time also locates and tracks frontal obstacles. It processes 25 frames per second (com-


ing from the two cameras, at 12.5 Hz) each made of about 1 Megapixel, providing a reconstruction of the tri-dimensional world in front of the vehicle every 80mil- liseconds, generating a 3D point cloud of about 10m points per second1


. The stereoscopic vision system is a


product of VisLab research and is now available to help other research centers as a low cost and small signature perception system: it includes software and hardware (cameras and processing board). The cur- rent version weights less than 1kg and is suitable also for unmanned aerial vehicles. As a further improvement, the


software algorithms, which now reached maturity, were frozen and, thanks to the help of an ERC PoC project, they are now being ported on a new low cost and low power hardware system, based on a simple FPGA. This new version is now under preparation and will join the current commercial-off-the-shelf-based product in late 2013; it will also be used in different applications besides the auto- motive arena.


||||||||| |||||||| ||||||||


 Prof. Alberto Broggi, PhD, is President and CEo of VisLab srl, the Artificial Vision and Intelligent Systems Laboratory


broggi@vislab.it


www.vislab.it/broggi www.vislab.it


The final video can be viewed at http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=PiUZ5NCXu-c


|||||||||


BRAiVE successfully navigating the route from the University Campus to Piazza della Pace thinkinghighways.com Vol 8 No 3 Europe/Rest of the World


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92