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TECHNOLOGY Autonomous safety systems


Safety connection C


Jugai Vijayvargiya on the technologies that serve as the building blocks to automated driving


onsumers today want to be con- nected more than ever. Estimates show that more than one billion


people use smart phones and 70 per cent of them are new car buyers. The increased use of smartphones, and the ways drivers are using them inside their vehicles, has changed rapidly. Although new and emerging technolo-


gies in cars are helping consumers stay connected, drivers are faced with more distractions making the task of staying focused on the road more challenging. There are 1.2m traffic-related fatali- ties globally each year with an alarming number of them due to driver distraction. In an effort to make driving safer,


advanced driver assistance systems are being employed to reduce accidents. To help drivers stay safely connected while driving, Delphi has applied its systems integration expertise by merging the vehicle’s safety systems with its infotain- ment systems. Delphi’s unique MyFi® ‘Connecting


with Safety’ system helps drivers stay focused on the road by managing the information available to drivers depend- ing on the driving conditions. For exam- ple, more information is available to users when the vehicle is stationary versus when it is moving. Additionally, when information from the vehicle’s safety sen- sors indicates unsafe conditions -- lane drift, stopped traffic or driver drowsi- ness -- audible or visual warnings direct the driver’s attention back to the road. If the driver does not react to these alerts, the system will engage one or more of the vehicle’s safety features, such as auto- mated braking or speed control, to avoid a potential collision. By equipping vehicles with advanced driver assistance systems, roads will


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‘MyFi® Connecting with Safety’ demonstrates how infotainment technology and safety technology can work together to keep drivers and passenger connected safely


become safer and more efficient. These innovations provide the basic building blocks that lead to automated driving.


THE PATH TO AUTONOMY The fundamental building blocks for future automated vehicles are already on the road today. It began with radar and camera-based collision-warning systems that scan the environment outside of the vehicle to alert drivers to potential haz- ards. These systems were then expanded to include collision mitigation function- ality, such as automated control of brak- ing and steering. High performance radar, vision and other sensing systems


thinkinghighways.com


can provide a 360 degree view around the vehicle. New advances already in devel- opment will speed the readiness for fully automated systems. Augmented by on-board and infra-


structure-based smart sensors, this ubiquitous connectivity will enable the vehicle to detect and communicate road conditions. This may include recogniz- ing pedestrians or other vehicles in the vicinity; receive, respond and relay traf- fic conditions; or anticipate impending collisions. All of this information will be used to either warn the driver to take necessary action or direct vehicular sys- tems to take self-correcting actions.


Vol 8 No 3 Europe/Rest of the World


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