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WALES


Edible rewards await hungry travellers in the land of cawl and rarebit. Some are so worth travelling for, you won’t even begrudge handing over the Severn Crossing toll. Sea breezers should head straight for the Pembrokeshire coastline and join Adam Vincent of Trehale Farm in Mathry, for a morning of seafood foraging and al fresco driftwood beach dining with a few of Adam’s rare-breed bangers thrown in for the perfect surf ’n’ turf lunch. Carmenthshire’s Cwmcrwth Farm is the perfect spot for a


DETOUR DINING Yes, you may not be able to understand or pronounce them, but if you see a sign for any of this top Welsh produce, make a detour immediately! ➳Penderyn Whisky ➳Blaenafon Cheddar Cheese ➳Welsh Mountain Beef ➳Welsh Venison Centre ➳Tregroes Waffl es ➳Halen Môn Sea Salt ➳Trealy Farm Charcuterie ➳Gower Salt Marsh Lamb ➳Aber Valley Apple Juice


family foodie weekend amidst 50 acres of the beautiful Towy Valley. The farmyard’s self-catering cottages provide the perfect base to explore their husbandry and cookery courses. Learn how to make your own pancetta, goat’s cheese or cure your own charcuterie, and if you’re thinking about rearing your own animals, enrol for the hands-on smallholding experience from £180pp. While you’re in the area, don’t forget Wright’s Food Emporium at Llanarthne for a basket of lip-smacking Welsh souvenirs that might not make it past the border. Everyone loves a food festival,


and the Welsh are no different, so plan your culinary diaries around a few of our favourites. The ever- popular Abergavenny Food Festival (20-21 Sept) tops our list for A-list chefs, delicious demos and a new street food night market for


Matt Tebbutt serving up food nearly as handsome as him at The Foxhunter (top right); while Chris Harrod has revitalised the menu and decor at The Crown


2014, while we’ll be getting our lactose fi x at The Big Cheese (26-28 July) set amidst the historic Caerphilly Castle grounds. Swing by Really Wild Food Festival (24-25 May) at Bishop’s Palace in St Davids for the best of Pembrokeshire’s artisan crafts and produce, before hot-footing it to the capital for the Cardiff Vegetarian Festival (15 June) and meat-free musings. Fine dining comes in many shapes, thanks to Wales’ trio of


single Michelin-star venues. Stéphane Borie’s The Checkers in Montgomery is pure French cuisine, Abergavenny’s The Walnut Tree, led by acclaimed chef Shaun Hill, shows no sign of slipping, and Llandrillo’s Tyddyn Llan, up in the North, completes the trio. All offer accommodation, too, so it’s easy to extend your weekend of luxury with a break away. Monmouthshire’s The Crown at Whitebrook is certainly worth a jaunt, and is well on its way to regaining its Michelin star since reopening under new owner and chef Chris Harrod. With a set lunch menu from just £24 for three courses, sampling Chris’s foraged and seasonal menu won’t break the bank either. Matt Tebbutt’s The Foxhunter in Nantyderry, near Usk,


celebrates 12 years under the TV chef’s reign, with a host of foraging courses confi rmed for 2014. Gain hands-on experience in identifying and using some of Britain’s edible wild plants with professional guides before creating a menu designed around your fi nds, from £140 per couple, including set lunch. From one TV presenter to another, our favourite wildlife


adventurer, Kate Humble, has also recently opened Humble By Nature – her Wye Valley farm, craft studio and cookery school. Make willow baskets, build a wood-fired pizza oven, learn how to shear sheep, keep bees, knead bread and preserve seasonal fruit, plus there’s even overnight accommodation, including a romantic shepherd’s hut hideaway.


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ON TOUR


HEPBURN PHOTOGRAPHY


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