This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Starters


on the block


Meet RAMONE BURTON, the new sous chef at The Chequers, Bath


When did you start cooking? Age 14, at my local pub – The Plume of Feathers in Princetown, Devon. I started off waiting tables, but they also let me do a bit of prep. As soon as I found myself in the kitchen, I knew I’d found what I wanted to do for a career. It’s the kitchen atmosphere that I love.


Fondest foodie memories from your childhood? When I was a kid, my dad used to make a lot of Mexican stuff, like tacos and enchiladas. I still love that kind of food.


What inspired you to cook professionally? When I was 15, I had work experience at a local hotel. It was only one-AA-Rosette cooking, which looking back now isn’t particularly special, but at the time it opened my eyes to a whole new world of food and technique. I was learning so much stuff every day, it was amazing.


Where might we know you from? I worked at The Olive Tree in Bath under Nick Brody, then, more recently, as sous chef at Ston Easton Park in Somerset.


How would you describe your cooking? Pretty classical. I try to let the ingredients speak for themselves, but I do like to use new techniques.


What attracted you to The Chequers? It was always my favourite place to eat in Bath, so when the position came up I was immediately interested. It seemed sensible to want to work at a place that I personally think is really good.


How have you approached the menu? A lot of our food is quite simple, but refined. It’s about really well- balanced flavours, textures and perfect execution.


What have been the biggest challenges in your career so far? I’d say when I first started at The Olive Tree. It was a big step up in terms of ambition for the food. I was thrown in the deep end, and used to go in two hours early every shift to make sure I’d be able to do my prep. It was a big challenge.


What are your favourite ingredients? I love working with game. If you can get hold of really good produce, it’s amazing to cook with. It’s very natural, has strong clean flavours and is very versatile. There’s just so much you can do with it.


Do you grow anything yourself? When I was a kid, I used to spend a lot of time with my uncle, growing vegetables on his allotment. We’re starting to grow a mini herb garden at The Chequers, but we’re a bit limited on space!


Which piece of kitchen equipment couldn’t you live without? A Rational oven – they’re an incredibly useful and versatile piece of kitchen kit.


What and where was the best meal you’ve eaten? Gordon Ramsay’s Maze. I went there a few years ago and it was amazing. So refined, so clean. It was one my first visits to a serious restaurant, and it made a big impression on me.


Where do you like to eat in Bath? Am I allowed to say here? Seriously, before I came to work at The Chequers, it was my favourite place to eat in Bath. Other than that, I had a really good meal at Menu Gordon Jones recently.


Favourite cookery book? I’ve got a book called Bentley: Contemporary Cuisine by Brent Savage. He’s Australian, and has lots of interesting techniques I hadn’t seen before. It’s really good.


Desert island dish? It would have to be steak – I love a great steak! ✱ www.thechequersbath.com


16


crumbsmag.com


New kid


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92