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Starters


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3. BRILLIANT BUTCHERS


As we’re being told to eat less meat, make sure the cuts you do buy are the best – locally sourced and prepared by an expert


1. Ruby & White Whiteladies Road, Bristol


Think of this Clifton gem as less a butchers and more a meat boutique. Owned by the gang behind Bristol steakhouse The Cowshed, it cost over £500k to fit out, spans 3,000sq ft and sells some of the best meat in the West. The ground floor, which is where


you’ll find the main counters, features a sexy mix of slate and exposed brick alongside crates of local veg and fresh bread. Up on the mezzanine is where you’ll see a range of deli items (think cheese, charcuterie, black pudding sausage rolls, paprika Scotch eggs and wine), and a kitchen area for cookery demos. Look further beyond that and you’ll see the state-of-the-art fridges through glass doors, where the team dry-age their native beef for 28-35 days. That’s not all they’re completely


transparent about either. Ask where their meat comes from, and they’ll be able to tell you all about the farms – the chickens are Cotswold Whites from near Radstock, for example – and even what the animals have been eating. (The lambs have been chomping down on grass, chicory and turnips of late.) The best bit, though? They’re open seven days a week, and do a three-for-£10 deal. Tescopoly who?


rubyandwhite.com


2. Bartlett & Sons Green Street, Bath


Having prepared locally sourced meat for over eight decades, butchering is in the Bartlett family’s blood. Originally owned by their father, but now run by Andrew Bartlett and his brother, the green-fronted shop on Bath’s Green Street (the only road in the city from which you can’t see fields or trees, ironically) serves a wealth of cuts from the surrounding counties. Using Wiltshire pork, the Bartlett boys


make their own sausages, and with beef sourced from nearby Great Smithcote Farm in Chippenham, they hand pat their burgers. Radstock’s Haywood Farm fulfills their poultry requirements too, so there’s no need to look any further for chicken, turkey or eggs in Bath. Alongside their traditional cuts you’ll


also find lesser-known steaks, such as the ‘flat iron’ and the ‘spider’. The versatile flat iron can be cooked and served more ways than Bubba’s shrimp in Forrest Gump, and the spider steak needn’t warrant a scream, as it comes from a cow’s hindquarter, as opposed to those eight-legged creepy crawlies. “A few years ago, these cuts weren’t very popular,” says Andrew, “but customers increasingly request them.” ✱ www.bartlettandsons.co.uk


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3. Walter Rose & Son Sidmouth Street, Devizes


With the likes of Michelin-starred Casamia, impossible-to-get-a-table Menu Gordon Jones and powerhouse Bath Ales choosing this Wiltshire-based butcher to supply their award-winning kitchens, you just know this family take their meat seriously. Owners Steve and Lizabeth Cook,


along with their sons, Jack and Charlie, source only the best of the South West’s meaty offerings by teaming up with like-minded local farmers who practice first-rate animal husbandry and welfare. With beef from Coulston’s Stokes Marsh Farm, pork from hand-reared pigs at Bishops Cannings and free-range poultry from Terry Hill, Radstock, you can bet their two high-street shops, in Devizes and Trowbridge, will be able to help you rustle up a midweek supper in no time. While you’re there, check out the


mountains of artisanal cheese, Bath Pig chorizo and Bath Fine Foods condiments, while traditionalists will doubtless get super-excited by the homemade faggots and Bath Chaps. We’ll be popping in for the new-season spring lamb, and to support the family’s next venture: becoming the only British outlet for unique fresh Iberico pork cuts. ✱ walterroseandson.co.uk


crumbsmag.com


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