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Starters Openings etc


PASS THE CHEESE


Once the home of popular cocktail and pizza bar Grappa, 3 Belvedere on Lansdown Road in Bath has reopened under a new name – Culture & Cure. The intimate venue has had a mini-makeover thanks to new owner Karen Cairns – a former chef, restaurateur and deli owner – who will be working in partnership with head chef Henry Scott. Warminster man Henry cut his culinary teeth at The Bath Priory before heading to the two-Michelin- starred Hibiscus in London. Together the pair are keen to shine a light on British tapas-style plates, with a menu packed full of local charcuterie, cheese and craft beer. Look out for the special ‘Bath Board’ – dedicated to the city’s best artisan produce, including Bath Soft Cheese, Bertinet


sourdough and Bath Harvest rapeseed oil. ✱ twitter.com/CultureandCure


Mitch rides in style!


Alex Venables with his catch of the day


FRESH


Culture & Cure’s new head chef, Henry Scott


CATCH There’s a new kid on the Farrington Gurney block in the form of Seasons Fish Kitchen. With Alex Venables and Alison Ward-Baptiste at the helm – formerly of the award-winning Tollgate Inn in Holt – the new venture, which opened in early April, will focus on healthy eating, the freshest fish and a made-to-order service. Located in the shopping


FIRST-CLASS DINER


In a bid to fulfill its promise to source and serve more locally produced food, First Great Western is sponsoring the inaugural Bristol Food Connections this May with a unique Pullman Pop-Up restaurant, hidden underneath the arches of Temple Meads at Hart’s Bakery. West Country chef Mitch Tonks has devised the fine-dining fodder now being offered to passengers on FGW trains, and, for one night only – 10 May – he will host an evening of same in the Pullman ‘carriage’ pop-up at Hart’s. The evening costs £40 for three courses and spaces are limited. ✱ To book, visit www.eventbrite.co.uk


Grape expectations


With the sea bass (p40)… This healthy, oriental-infused fish recipe is full of fragrant, aromatic flavours and so it needs a bright, zesty white to partner. Look no further than Skillogalee Riesling 2012 from South Australia (£14.95). Riesling made properly is simply glorious, and this example is lively, searingly dry, yet with a vibrant, aromatic edge. It’s packed with zesty lime freshness.


village of Farrington’s Farm Shop estate, head chef Alex, who previously won a Michelin star at Lucknam Park, will cook everything to order for customers to either eat in or take home. Daily deliveries from the West Country’s family-owned coastal boats will supply the kitchen with daily changing menus, a ‘Catch of the Day’ and plenty of cookery demos, gourmet dinners and private dining opportunities


throughout the summer. ✱ www.seasonskitchen.co.uk


Matchmaker ANGELA MOUNT gives her top tips for pairing wine with our recipes, this issue’s selection appearing from page 34 on…


With the barbecued lamb (p34)… There are masses of flavours going on in this fragrant Middle Eastern dish. Lamb is a natural match with rich yet soft red wines, and one of my faves is Plumbago Nero D’Avola 2012, Planeta (£13.50). It’s a sumptuous feast of a wine, with gloriously ripe black cherry and plum flavours and a spicy, mocha edge – silky smooth, and spot on for this recipe.


With the cottage pie (p75)… One of the nation’s favourite dishes, cottage pie needs a simple, hearty, easy-drinking red to match – nothing complicated, just an enjoyable, soft, fruity wine. Try the Ken Forrester Petit Pinotage (£9.25, but down to £7.88 until 30 April) – ripe berry fruit, rich plum and mocha spice notes, and a silky soft style. Juicy, bold and fruity, it’s a fabulous match to this classic.


All of these wines can be bought at Great Western Wine in Bath or online at www.greatwesternwine.co.uk 10 crumbsmag.com


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