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YOUR LIFE, YOUR STYLE


Bespoke


solutions you could write a book about


Paul Dagarin finds a bespoke tailor that has a surprising amount in common with the Family Office wealth solution.


W


alking into J. H. Cutler’s uptown Sydney rooms is an adventure steeped somehow in mystery. Housed in an unassuming


office building, the slightly rickety lift takes an age to ascend the six stories. Literally. Upon entering the J.H. Cutler showrooms and fitting rooms, it’s clear you have travelled more than six stories; you have been transported to another age. An age of class, comfort and luxury. An age in which the customer is special. A far, far better age. John Cutler is the fourth generation of his


family to run the family bespoke tailoring business. Like the business, John was born in Australia but is steeped in the culture of London’s Savile Row. “I knew university was not for me,”


says John. “I was already making the occasional waistcoat for my teachers and working Saturday in the family business. So I left school at 16 and worked for two years for the business. When I was 18, I sold my motorbike and my drum kit and bought a ticket on the ‘Castel Felice’


to England.” John Cutler 92 FAMILY OFFICE: THE FUTURE


After spending three years in London refining his tailoring skills at the Tailor and Cutter Academy, John returned to the family business reinvigorated. J.H. Cutler and John have been able to apply the Savile Row culture so effortlessly in an Antipodean location because of a unique approach. For a start, John is not English – he’s Australian and he doesn’t hide it. So there is no pretence, only tradition. He takes the best from Saville Row and applies them in O’Connell St, Sydney, in his own way. The wooden counter is churchlike but


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