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Education for the future


“It is in fact a part of the function of education to help us escape, not from our own time – for we are bound by that – but from the intellectual and emotional limitations of our time.” – ENGLISH POET T.S. ELIOT


“Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education.”


– US CIVIL RIGHTS LEADER MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR


“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to


change the world.” This looks like an easy choice: stipends are


cheaper. And the donor would know exactly how many students it is impacting: a simple indicator of success would be the number of number of students completing their primary schooling and qualifying for secondary education. However, such a simple monetary calculation doesn’t take into account longer term or wider community impact. What other factors do, or should a donor be taking


into consideration? What would be the multiplier impact of supporting an intensive teacher-training program in the same community for the same cost? Each project is unique. A well-designed project incorporates


the donor’s interest, the project beneficiaries (including the larger community), the various program options, and the most appropriate methods of measuring impact based on best practices from around the world. Continuous advancement and implementation of appropriate measurements


are critical in giving confidence in strategic philanthropy. After all, who would ever knowingly want to write a big cheque and hope for the best?


Paul Angwin is the Asia Pacific managing director of People and Planet: www.pandp.me


FAMILY OFFICE: THE FUTURE 57


– THE FATHER OF MODERN


SOUTH AFRICA, NELSON


MANDELA


“The direction in which education starts a man


will determine his future in life.”


– ANCIENT GREEK PHILOSOPHER, PLATO


VENTURE PHILANTHROPY, EDUCATION & VALUES


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