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Heart and mind – keys to successful investment


ZINZAN CUNNINGHAM TALKS TO VISIONARY INVESTMENT GROUP CEO MICHAEL GUO ABOUT AUSTRALIA-CHINESE INVESTMENT.


Q What sort of services are UHNW Chinese looking for in Australia?


A Based on our experiences, when it comes to investments, UHNW Chinese are looking to get tailor-


made services with bespoke solutions for their specific needs. The last thing they want to get is to be treated like others. And more importantly they want to have the upmost confidentiality. They only want to socialise with other UHNW Chinese investors when they feel comfortable and know that they will be meeting the like-minded.


Q You’re a bicultural businessperson who has been educated and gained corporate experience


in China, the US and now Australia. What do you see as the main challenges for Chinese people who are becoming involved in Australian investments? And what are the rewards?


A The biggest challenge for them I believe is to find the right people who they can trust with their


investments. Most of the HNW and UHNW Chinese are sophisticated about business and investment. And some of them rightfully admit that they do not have the knowledge and experience about investing in Australia where the culture, legal environment and economy are very different to that in China. However they understand the opportunities that Australia has to offer both in the short- and long-term; opportunities that other developed countries do not bring. They realise the key to a successful investment outcome is to partner with the right people who have both the brain and heart they can trust.


Q Client relationship management is a large part of your business. In what ways do you ensure


you’re delivering the best?


A It goes without saying that our clients are the most important part of our business. And we deeply believe


that our success is built on the basis of making our clients successful. What makes us different from others is that we are not afraid to ask questions of our clients about what they want and need. And we listen. Then we go above and beyond to make sure that we deliver. We always keep our clients informed. We always seek their advice and feedback because we believe we can always do better.


Q How might the marketing of, for instance, real estate differ between Australia and China?


A Properties and the real estate sector are very different between the two countries. We understand what those


differences are in product, legislation, market standards and, most importantly, expectations. So we start by letting people know that those differences are always guiding what we do in designing, building and marketing properties. In fact, the biggest challenge in marketing our properties to Chinese investors is not showing how good the project is, but rather it is possible to have such good projects as investments.


Q When you educate high-end Chinese individuals and business clients, what are the range of criteria you


believe they use to judge the success of your advice?


A They judge our advice by their experience and instinct. But the most important criterion is the tested successful


result of such advice. They value advice that’s based on experience and their needs, not theoretical experiments.


16 FAMILY OFFICE: THE FUTURE


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